Dental License by State Drives Many Dentists Crazy (video)

universal dental licenseAs we all know, dentists are licensed by state dental boards and they can only practice in the state where they are licensed.

And this drives a lot of dentists crazy like the one who complained, “This is SUPPOSED to be a free country where people can relocate as desired. this current system is just regional protectionism. It sucks!”

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey that asked dentists if once a dentist is licensed in one state, should he or she be allowed to practice anywhere in the U.S.

Watch this video to hear what dentists had to say on universal licensure

What are your thoughts on universal licensure? Should dentists be allowed to practice anywhere in the U.S. under one license?

1 in 4 General Dentists Remove Wisdom Teeth (video)

1 in 4 General Dentists Remove Wisdom Teeth (video)General dentists can do wisdom teeth extractions, except when they can’t and need to refer the patient to an oral surgeon.

Some dentists prefer to do these procedures themselves, whereas others still refer the patient out whenever possible.

Said one dentist who refers out all removals, “That’s what oral surgeons are for!” Another general dentist said, “I am glad oral surgeons are there, but most surgical wisdom teeth are very easy.”

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey asking dentists what percentage of wisdom teeth removal they refer out to an oral surgeonWatch the following video to hear the results of the survey and what other dentists had to say on the subject —

How do you handle wisdom tooth removal?

Dentist Survey: Do You Own or Rent Your Dental Practice Real Estate?

Dental real estate: rent vs. ownThis survey by The Wealthy Dentist asked about a major dental practice management expense. Do dentists lease or own their dental real estate?

More than three-quarters of the dentists surveyed own their practice facilities.

Despite unstable real estate values across the U.S. within the past 10 years, dentists still prefer to own rather than rent.

Only 3% of the respondents own and are worried about their mortgage. The majority of dentists either own the building free and clear ( 35% ),  or own it and pay a reasonable mortgage (39% ).

Do dentists rent or own their dental practice facilities?“Always own your property; best investment you can make.” New York dentist

“If the facility is a good investment – own it.” Tennessee dentist

“It all depends on location but generally owning the dental practice real estate affords one a greater opportunity to build wealth.” Nevada dentist

“There is security in knowing that my rent will not go up and I will not have to move due to a change of ownership.” Texas dentist

“Much better to own the right building in the right location. Problem is the right location is changing as dental practice is changing.” California orthodontist

Fewer than one quarter of our dentists rent their facilities, with 10% on a long term lease, and 13% on a lease expiring in less than two years.

“Owning would be far preferable to renting, but unfortunately my landlord won’t sell. Real estate is very limited in my area.” California oral surgeon

“Tenant improvements (and repayment) are the real killer!” California dentist

Do you think it’s better to own or rent your dental practice real estate?

Dental Practice Management: Scheduling a Comprehensive Exam

Dental Practice Management: Scheduling a Comprehensive Exam
What is the best dental practice management policy on length of a new patient exam?

51% schedule a minimum of 40 minutes for comprehensive dental exams, this survey found.

Only 27% of dentists said they perform comprehensive exams in less than 30 minutes.

“Actually, I schedule an hour and sometimes it takes longer The compete exam is THE single greatest internal dental marketing technique,” offered one dentist, a subtle comment for comprehensive exams being a part of an overall dental marketing plan.

Here’s how dentists responded to this survey asking what length of time they schedule for an initial comprehensive exam:

  • 4% 10 minutes.
  • 10% 15 minutes.
  • 10% 20 minutes.
  • 3% 25 minutes.
  • 22% 30 minutes
  • 51% 40+ minutes.

Here are some further comments on scheduling comprehensive exams from dentists:

It should be one hour …

“One hour. It’s COMPREHENSIVE. That cannot be done in less than 45 minutes. It means you are looking at radiographs, perio probing, restorative, occlusion, TMJ, health history, and oral cancer exam. I defy anyone who says that a “comprehensive” exam can be done any faster.” (Georgia dentist)

“For new patients, an hour max, but if I only give them 20 minutes of my time, I don’t get the case as often.” (Illinois dentist)

“Really should schedule 50 or 60 minutes on adults.” (General dentist)

“We schedule one hour initial exam for perio charting, radiographs, photos, models, charting restoration, and for getting to know the patient.” (Michigan dentist)

“We schedule an hour, but sometimes it takes even longer.” (California dentist)

It should be more than an hour …

“We schedule 1 1/2 hours for initial medical history gathering, interview, complimentary Velscope cancer screening, necessary x-rays and comprehensive exam. NO cleaning at this appointment.” (Minnesota dentist)

“I actually spend and hour and a half for each new patient examination. Not one gets into hygiene without a NP exam.” (Washington dentist)

“My first appointment is 1.5 hours in length with a pre-paid reservation fee.” (California dentist)

“My patient is scheduled for 2 hours. In that time we take photos, x-rays, models and intra-oral images as well as the full exam, interview and charting with the doctor.” (New Jersey dentist)

“We schedule 90 minutes. 45 minutes for the exam and 45 minutes for records.” (Florida dentist)

Note: Survey sample included 100 respondents.

Cosmetic Dentistry Still Tops the List of Services Dentists Offer

Cosmetic Dentistry Still Tops the List of Services Dentists OfferWhen asked what services their dental practice offers, the dentists who responded with cosmetic dentistry were the clear majority in this survey.

More aging baby boomers are turning to cosmetic dentistry to improve the appearance of their teeth, which may explain the increase in demand for cosmetic dentistry services.

Dental implants are the most popular dental treatment among this demographic for the replacement of damaged or missing teeth.

A California dentist shared, “More than half of our practice is dental implants now!”

Here at The Wealthy Dentist, we were curious what services dentists are currently offering. The top services offered by dentists who responded to this survey are cosmetic, tooth whitening, dental implants, dentures, and children’s dentistry.

Here’s a breakdown of the services dentists are offering —

List of Services Dentists Offer

Dentists were disappointed that other services were not included in this survey, like Botox, oral cancer screenings, or offering custom mouthguards for patient athletes.

One prosthodontist noted, “Oral cancer screening and testing was not on the survey list. Also, it would be interesting to know how many offices provide Botox.”

A general dentist responded that he now offers same day service for CEREC restorations as part of his dental practice services.

Another dentist answered tongue-in-cheek, “I don’t offer gum disease, I treat it.”

What dental services does your dental practice offer? Has the demand for cosmetic dentistry increased?

Where is your dental marketing focused?

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