Dentists: Would a Former Associate Steal Your Dental Patients? (video)

Dentists: Would a Former Associate Steal Your Dental Patients? (video)Dentists, do you think an ex-employee or associate would steal your dental patient lists?

In a survey conducted by the research firm Ponemon Institute, 59% of ex-employees admitted to stealing company data when leaving their prior employment.

Dental patients are a dentist’s most valuable resource, but competition can be so tough that some dentists have seen exiting dental employees steal their patient lists.

One dentist complained, “Every GP associate I’ve had has tried to steal patients. It’s like inviting someone into your home, then finding your silverware is missing after they leave.”

Another dentist said, “I’ve had employees try; the patients usually complain to me personally about the situation. Loyalty is rewarded.”

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey asking dentists if they have ever had problems with ‘patient stealing‘ by associate dentists or employees leaving their dental practice.

To hear how dentists responded, Click on Play —

What has been your experience with dental pateint stealing at your dental practice?

How Do Dentists REALLY Feel About Dental Management Companies? (Survey Results)

Dentist survey results on dental management companiesIn this dentist survey, we asked about dental management companies:

Do you agree or disagree with this statement? “Only dentists should own dental practices.”

Only 12% of our respondents strongly disagreed. They believe that owning a dental practice does not and should not require clinical training in dentistry.

“From the greed and avarice exhibited, as well as over treatment and the selling/pushing of questionable dental items to individuals seeking treatment, I don’t see any difference in letting dentists vs. non dentists own these businesses.” South Carolina general dentist

Another 12% were in the middle:

  • 8% somewhat agreed, and believe that practice owners should generally be dentists, but there are exceptions;
  • 4% somewhat disagreed. They believe it’s okay for others to own practices, but that it’s good when dentists do.

Dental practice management survey results chartThe overwhelming 76% majority of dentists strongly believe that dentists should be owners, not dental management companies or private investors.

Practice management companies should only be business “consultants” as they do not have any medical/dental training and their objectives are merely economic.” Massachusetts
general dentist

“I have witnessed firsthand the moral and ethical degradation of the profession at the hands of dental management companies who are only focused on production,” said a California orthodontist.

He went on to say, “I have seen 3 of the best dentists fired because they were not “producing” enough. One of them said to me, “I am not willing to compromise my ethics, morals or values and create work that is not there.” Gone. I found out from his office manager that the new dentist who replaced him doubled production in less than a year by following the office manager’s recommendations. How did twice the amount of work get ‘created?'”

What’s your opinion of dental management companies?

Dental Management: The Value of Entrepreneurism

dental management entrepreneural opportunity Dentists are classic entrepreneurs — they seek to better themselves through education, and take economic risks (the cost of education, the cost of opening and managing a dental practice) in pursuit of a better life for themselves and their families.

According to American Enterprise Institute President Arthur Brooks, “Earned success gives people a sense of meaning about their lives.”

Moreover, by succeeding as entrepreneurs, Dentists keep alive the American Dream that others may likewise create a better life for themselves, if they too elect to take advantage of the opportunities that exist.

The recent marriage of Prince William to Catherine Middleton, child of two employees-turned-entrepreneurs, broke tradition in Great Britain and brought attention to the value of entrepreneurism.

“The Middletons symbolize the opportunity that exists in a free-market system for those who take advantage of it. It is worth noting that they founded (their business) during the Thatcher era, when the Conservative government focused on lifting barriers to entrepreneurs through lower taxation, less regulation , and privatization,” writes John Berlau, a director at the Competitive Enterprise Institute in Washington, D.C.

The idea of ordinary people building successful businesses — a concept often called the ‘American Dream’ — is now realized in certain British TV programs.

One study of thousands of British employees revealed that the workers’ perception of happiness actually rose as their demographic group’s average income increases relative to their own. It was the opportunity to advance that mattered.

When William and Kate said ‘I do,’ the royal family of Britain “officially wed the dreams and aspirations of millions of entrepreneurs in the UK, the U.S., and throughout the world” . . . and maybe some dentists too.

For more on this story see: The Entrepreneurs’ Princess

Dental Practice Management: Scheduling a Comprehensive Exam

Dental Practice Management: Scheduling a Comprehensive Exam
What is the best dental practice management policy on length of a new patient exam?

51% schedule a minimum of 40 minutes for comprehensive dental exams, this survey found.

Only 27% of dentists said they perform comprehensive exams in less than 30 minutes.

“Actually, I schedule an hour and sometimes it takes longer The compete exam is THE single greatest internal dental marketing technique,” offered one dentist, a subtle comment for comprehensive exams being a part of an overall dental marketing plan.

Here’s how dentists responded to this survey asking what length of time they schedule for an initial comprehensive exam:

  • 4% 10 minutes.
  • 10% 15 minutes.
  • 10% 20 minutes.
  • 3% 25 minutes.
  • 22% 30 minutes
  • 51% 40+ minutes.

Here are some further comments on scheduling comprehensive exams from dentists:

It should be one hour …

“One hour. It’s COMPREHENSIVE. That cannot be done in less than 45 minutes. It means you are looking at radiographs, perio probing, restorative, occlusion, TMJ, health history, and oral cancer exam. I defy anyone who says that a “comprehensive” exam can be done any faster.” (Georgia dentist)

“For new patients, an hour max, but if I only give them 20 minutes of my time, I don’t get the case as often.” (Illinois dentist)

“Really should schedule 50 or 60 minutes on adults.” (General dentist)

“We schedule one hour initial exam for perio charting, radiographs, photos, models, charting restoration, and for getting to know the patient.” (Michigan dentist)

“We schedule an hour, but sometimes it takes even longer.” (California dentist)

It should be more than an hour …

“We schedule 1 1/2 hours for initial medical history gathering, interview, complimentary Velscope cancer screening, necessary x-rays and comprehensive exam. NO cleaning at this appointment.” (Minnesota dentist)

“I actually spend and hour and a half for each new patient examination. Not one gets into hygiene without a NP exam.” (Washington dentist)

“My first appointment is 1.5 hours in length with a pre-paid reservation fee.” (California dentist)

“My patient is scheduled for 2 hours. In that time we take photos, x-rays, models and intra-oral images as well as the full exam, interview and charting with the doctor.” (New Jersey dentist)

“We schedule 90 minutes. 45 minutes for the exam and 45 minutes for records.” (Florida dentist)

Note: Survey sample included 100 respondents.

Is Creating a Dental Insurance Club Smart Dental Marketing?

Is Creating a Dental Insurance Club Smart Dental Marketing?Now, more than ever, dentists must be smart about their dental marketing efforts, but do these efforts need to include creating a solution for uninsured dental patients?

A local Evansville, Indiana dentist thinks so.

Dentist Chris Meunier has developed a way for his uninsured dental patients to afford dental care by creating a dental insurance club.

Dr. Meunier told 14News.com that his private dental insurance plan acts like a dental club.

For a yearly membership fee of $299, dental patients can receive dental care from Dr. Meunier for procedures such as teeth cleanings, dental X-rays and periodic dental exams. The membership plan also gives patients a 20% discount on most dental treatments.

“Most of the patients that we are signing up are patients that we have been treating anyway and they don’t have dental coverage, so they are paying my full fee out of pocket. So now they are getting the benefit of the membership and they are getting 20% off of certain procedures that they need to have done. They get some tooth whitening that’s included too, so it’s been a good thing,” Meunier told 14News.com.

Dr. Meunier’s dental plan is smart because it stimulate loyalty and permanent relationships with some of his best dental patients.

Do you think this is a brilliant dental marketing move by the dentist, or do you think implementing your own dental insurance club would create more hassle than it’s worth?

For more on this story see: Local Dentist Setting Up Plan to Help Those Without Insurance

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