tooth decay Archives - The Wealthy Dentist

Acidic Foods Are a Major Cause of Tooth Decay

 

AGD Focuses on Tooth Erosion from Acidic Foods

At the Academy of General Dentistry’s upcoming annual meeting, speaker Dr. David Bartlett will discuss how to minimize tooth erosion caused by acid. He suggests patients consume acidic food and drink (soda, juice, fruit, yogurt, etc.) quickly and during mealtimes.

The focus is not on the patient’s diet, but simply on exposure to acid. Dr. Bartlett also suggests patients wait at least 20 minutes to brush teeth after eating acidic foods.

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Kids’ Dental Health Related to Mom’s

Mothers with untreated tooth decay are twice as likely to have children who do too.

That’s according to a new study that was published in the Journal of Dental Research. Researchers at the University of California in San Francisco looked at the oral health of 179 mothers and 389 children.

This highlights the role of parental dental health in pediatric dentistry. In addition, parents may be more likely to treat tooth decay and gum disease if they realize it may negatively impact their children’s dental health.

Read more: Mums who neglect teeth impact on kids’ oral health

Dentists Reveal Alarming Cavity Problem Among Preschool Children

Dentists Reveal Alarming Cavity Problem Among Preschool ChildrenDentists across the U.S. are reporting an increase in young dental patients with cavities.

Some dentists feel that this increase is due to parents skipping children’s regular dental appointments during tight economic times and not pushing young children to brush their teeth after each meal, or at least twice a day.

But could this possibly be linked to a reduction, or lack of fluoridated water beyond regular oral hygiene?

The CDC reports that over 19% of children ages 2-19 have untreated cavities — the first increase in 40 years, with the largest increase in the number of preschoolers with cavities since the last study completed five years ago.

The New York Times recently reported that dentists nationwide say they are seeing more preschoolers at all income levels with 6 to 10 cavities or more. The level of decay, they added, is so severe that they often recommend using general anesthesia because young children are unlikely to sit through such extensive procedures while they are awake.

Dr. Jonathan Shenkin, a pediatric dentist in Augusta, Me. told the New York Times, “I have parents tell me all the time, ‘No one told us when to go to the dentist, when we should start using fluoride toothpaste’ — all this basic information to combat the No. 1 chronic disease in children.”

Dentists believe there are several contributing factors to the increase in tooth decay: lack of regular, enforced tooth brushing, too many sweetened juices without brushing, regular visits to the dentist starting when the child is 1, and parents who are choosing bottled water over fluoridated tap water.

The Times article features an image of the surgical wing of the Center for Pediatric Dentistry at Seattle Children’s Hospital with 30-month-old Devon Koester.  Eleven, of his twenty baby teeth are being treated due to cavities.

NBC’s chief medical editor, Dr. Nancy Snyderman spoke to the tooth decay problem on the “Today” show. She said that too much sugar, lack of regular brushing, and drinking bottled water instead of regular old tap water has exacerbated the problem.

Dr. Snyderman offers the following report on tooth decay in children’s teeth —


The American Dental Association offers the following tips for parents with babies, Toddlers and Pre-Schoolers —

  • After each feeding, clean the baby’s gums with a clean wet gauze pad or washcloth.
  • When teeth start to appear, brush them with a child’s size toothbrush and plain water.
  • At the direction of your dentist, some children under two may benefit from the use of fluoride toothpaste. Look for toothbrushes that carry the ADA Seal of Acceptance.  They have been evaluated by the ADA for safety and effectiveness.
  • Begin flossing when at least two teeth begin to touch.
  • Start dental visits by the child’s first birthday. Make visits regularly. If you think your child has dental problems, take the child to the dentist as soon as possible.
  • Brush teeth of children over age two with a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste and make sure to floss daily. Look for toothpastes that carry the ADA Seal of Acceptance. They have been evaluated by the ADA for safety and effectiveness.
  • Children should be supervised while brushing to keep them from swallowing the toothpaste.

Dentists, what has been your experience? Have you seen an increase in young children with severe cavity problems?

What do you think are the reasons behind this growing dental care trend?

For more on this story see: Preschoolers in Surgery for a Mouthful of Cavities

Oral Health Research Claims High-fluoride Massage Prevents Tooth Decay by 400%

Oral Health Research Claims High-fluoride Massage Prevents Tooth Decay by 400%New oral health research claims that massaging teeth with a high-fluoride toothpaste  increases protection against tooth decay by 400%, according to a report by Anna Nordström, a dentist and researcher at the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

A new brand of toothpaste was launched 8 years ago in Sweden with more than 3 times as much fluoride as standard toothpaste.

The toothpaste is available to the public without prescription and is aimed primarily at those at high risk for tooth decay.

Researchers at the University of Gothenburg’s Sahlgrenska Academy have now performed the first scientific evaluation of the effect of this so-called “high-fluoride toothpaste.”  The study has resulted in a new method that offers dental patients 4 times the level of protection from fluoride.

In the study, 16 volunteers tested a variety of brushing techniques, using either high-fluoride or standard toothpaste, and brushing either 2 or 3 times a day.

“The study revealed that those who used a high-fluoride toothpaste three times a day had four times better fluoride protection in the mouth than those who used standard toothpaste twice a day,” asserts researcher Anna Nordström from the Institute of Odontology at the Sahlgrenska Academy.

Also tested was a new method of applying toothpaste developed in collaboration with professor Dowen Birkhed, which involves rubbing the toothpaste onto the teeth with a finger.

“This ‘massage’ method proved to be at least as effective as a third brushing in increasing the amount of fluoride in the mouth,” stressed Anna Nordström . “Rubbing the front of your teeth with toothpaste can be an easy way of giving your teeth a third “shot” of fluoride during the day, after lunch for example. But this should not replace brushing with a fluoride toothpaste morning and evening – it’s an extra teeth cleaning).”

Brushing with fluoride toothpaste continues to play a major role in combating tooth decay, and there is strong scientific evidence that daily use of fluoride toothpaste has a pronounced preventive effect.

The study Effect of a Third Application of Toothpaste (1450 and 5000 ppm F), including a “massage” method on fluoride retention and pH drop in plaque was published in Acta Odontologica Scandinavia.

The researchers offered the following 4 tips for dental patients for successfully fighting tooth decay  —

1.  Use toothpaste at least twice a day, after breakfast and before going to bed.
2.  If necessary, brush a third time or rub toothpaste on the teeth instead.
3.  If you have problems with cavities, choose a toothpaste with a higher fluoride content.
4.   Avoid rinsing out the toothpaste with water.

Dentists, what do you think of this oral health study and how massaging fluoride toothpaste on to teeth increases the effectiveness in fighting tooth decay?

For more on this story see: New Massage Method Quadruples Protection Against Tooth Decay

Science Friday: Will Better Cavity Filling Technology Make Dental Implants Obsolete?

Will Better Cavity Filling Technology Make Dental Implants Obsolete?Will dental implants be a thing of the past with the help of new dental technologies?

The University of Maryland School of Dentistry has announced that scientists using nanotechology have created the first cavity-filling composite that kills harmful bacteria and regenerates tooth structure lost to bacterial decay, as reported by Newswire.

“Rather than just limiting tooth decay with conventional fillings, the new composite is a revolutionary dental weapon to control harmful bacteria, which co-exist in the natural colony of microorganisms in the mouth,” says professor Huakun (Hockin) Xu, PhD, MS.

“Tooth decay means that the mineral content in the tooth has been dissolved by the organic acids secreted by bacteria residing in biofilms or plaques on the tooth surface. These organisms convert carbohydrates to acids that decrease the minerals in the tooth structure,” says Xu, director of the Division of Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering in the School’s Department of Endodontics, Prosthodontics and Operative Dentistry.

After a dentist drills out a decayed tooth, the cavity still contains residual bacteria. Xu says it is not possible for a dentist to remove all the damaged tissue, so it’s important to neutralize the harmful effects of the bacteria, which is just what the new nanocomposites are able to do.

The researchers also have built antibacterial agents into primer used first by dentists to prepare a drilled-out cavity and into adhesives that dentists spread into the cavity to make a filling stick tight to the tissue of the tooth.

“The reason we want to get the antibacterial agents also into primers and adhesives is that these are the first things that cover the internal surfaces of the tooth cavity and flow into tiny dental tubules inside the tooth,” says Xu. The main reason for failures in tooth restorations and secondary caries or decay at the restoration margins. “Applying the new primer and adhesive will kill the residual bacteria,” he says.

Fillings made from the School of Dentistry’s new nanocomposite, with antibacterial primer and antibacterial adhesive, should last longer than the typical five to 10 years, though the scientists have not thoroughly tested longevity. Xu says a key component of the new nanocomposite and nano-structured adhesive is calcium phosphate nanoparticles that regenerate tooth minerals. The antibacterial component has a base of quaternary ammonium and silver nanoparticles along with a high pH.

The alkaline pH limits acid production by tooth bacteria.

“The bottom line is we are continuing to improve these materials and making them stronger in their antibacterial and remineralizing capacities as well as increasing their longevity,” Xu says.

The new dental products have been laboratory tested using biofilms from saliva of volunteers. The Xu team is planning to next test its products in animal teeth and in human volunteers in collaboration with the Federal University of Ceara in Brazil.

The University of Maryland has patents pending on the nanocomposite and the primer and adhesive technologies, according to Nancy Cowger, PhD, licensing officer with the University’s Office of Technology Transfer (OTT).

Licensing opportunities are available, she says, and potential development partners are invited to contact the OTT at www.ord.umaryland.edu/ott

Source: Dental Fillings That Kill Bacteria and Re-Mineralize the Tooth

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