Braces Cost: Braces Fee Survey Analysis Results

cost of braces fee analysisThe Wealthy Dentist conducted a braces survey asking doctors how much they charge for braces.

We found that general dentists charge an average of $4350 for orthodontia work, while orthodontists charge $5141.

Some orthodontists felt that braces should cost more.

“The average price should be $7500-8500 based on inflation. Unfortunately, managed care practices and #$&!@!! general dentists are screwing up pricing. In turn, this ‘trickle down effect’ will only hurt dentists who should be getting $1800 for a crown!” expressed a Colorado orthodontist.

Location is factor that can influence the cost of braces. California is known for being one of the most expensive states for dental treatments in general, and braces are no different.

Suburban dentists’ braces fees have increased to match their urban counterparts, which is a change in the last two years.

Here a few comments from doctors:

“We do Invisalign at a lower cost but only if it is minor movement with treatment taking only a couple of months.” (Pennsylvania dentist)

“My cases are treated with better and more individualized diagnosis, and finish with better facial aesthetics, better occlusion, a better smile line and better function.” (Illinois orthodontist)

“The cost of braces depends on the type and length of treatment.” (New Jersey orthodontist)

“Well-trained GP’s are fully capable of providing orthodontic services!” (Ohio dentist)

“We only do Invisalign.” (General dentist)

The Journal of Clinical Orthodontics conducted an orthodontic practice study in 2007 on the average cost of braces in the United States. The study found that for comprehensive treatment of orthodontics the costs averaged $5,354 for adults and $4,914 for children.

Has the cost of braces remained flat or increased in your area over the last four years?

For more on this survey see: Braces Cost an Average of $4,350 at General Dentist

Dental Survey: Lead is the Number One Dentist Concern (video)

Dental Survey: Lead is the Number One Dentist Concern Mercury and Fluoride, two chemicals that can be highly toxic, or highly helpful to dental health.

Lead and Bisphenol A, two more scary chemicals that might be in our dental work. It’s enough to make you wonder whether dentists might sometimes be doing more harm than good.

What’s worse, the scientific evidence isn’t clear.

Sighed one dentist, “I’d like to be doing all gold restorations.”

Another dentist commented, “I feel it’s ironic that some patients don’t want ‘artificial chemicals’ in their mouth and decline the natural elements in amalgam in favor of the complex chemistry of composites!”

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey of dentists asking how concerned they are about various potential public health threats linked to chemicals in dentistry.

Click on Play to hear what chemicals concern dentists the most —

What dental chemicals concern you?

Dental Practice Marketing: Do Specialists Refer Patients Back to Dentists? (video)

Dental Practice Marketing: Do Specialists Refer Patients Back to Dentists? (video)When it comes to specialists, a lot of general dentists feel like they can’t live with them, but they can’t live without them either.

When it comes to dental practice marketing and general dentists referring dental patients out to specialists, they secretly fear they will never see those patients again.

Complained one dentist, Periodontists never refer back, never keep me informed of the treatment rendered and even refer my patients to oral surgeons for things I would like to do myself.”

But a more optimistic dentist advised, “Building a good relationship with your specialists is critical. Specialist referrals are our second greatest source of new dental patients, after existing patient referrals.”

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey asking dentists how frequently their patients are referred back after being sent out for treatment by specialists.

To hear how the dentists responded, Click Play to hear the survey results —

Dentists: do specialists you work with refer patients back to you? Are referrals from specialists a factor in your dental practice marketing?

Dentist Feels Sedation Dentistry Helps Many Patients

Dentist Feels Sedation Dentistry Helps Many PatientsThree out of four dentists surveyed offer sedation dentistry.

“Sedation dentistry helps so many people. Most stop using it after three visits or so due to a significant lessening of their anxiety,” responded one prosthodontist to the latest The Wealthy Dentist survey that asked dentists if they offer dental sedation.

“Sedation is not the be-all, end-all,” advised one dentist.

The respondents to this survey reflected the following charges for sedation services —

The lowest cost of conscious sedation dentistry was $70, and the highest charge was $680. The cost of IV sedation ranged from $225 up to $1,200.

Percent of dentists who perform sedation dentistry

Here are some comments from dentists who responded to this survey —

“It is great combination with CEREC users. One appointment dentistry while sedated.” (General dentist)

“There is a strong pain-in-the-butt factor associated with this service. Don’t get sucked into it.” (Massachusetts dentist)

“I’ve been sedating for 30 years.” (California dentist)

“I am a dentist anesthesiologist. I charge an hourly fee. I am perfectly fine with my client doctors doing oral sedation with proper training. I think it is important that they have someone like me to check with if they have a question or concern.” (Washington dentist anesthesiologist)

“Having well-trained providers of dental sedation is a key to our success as a profession. As long as there are dentists who believe in papoosing, there will be those who have fears. Funny, an ENT would never papoose a child for ear tubes. Why do we think it’s acceptable for dental treatment?” (Pediatric dentist)

If you are a doctor who offers sedation dentistry to your patients, it’s important to market this fact to potential patients. It can help bring new patients into your dental practice.

Dental Practice Management Survey: Dental Fee Increases Depend on Local Economies

Raising dental feesThis dental practice management survey asked dentists how often they raise their fees.

There’s a mixture of good and bad news, depending on local economic health.

Most dentists have raised their fees in the past 2 years.

Close to a third (30%) of the dentists we surveyed said they raise fees every year.

Almost a quarter (24%) answered that they’ve increased fees during the past 2 years, but not in the past year.

At the other extreme, 5%  have lowered their fees during the past year. Said a Washington Dentist in this group, “One of our insurance providers froze our fees and lowered our reimbursement by 15%.”

The rest of the responses were split — 14% said they haven’t raised fees in over 2 years; 19% said it’s been more than 3 years, and 8% said it’s been more than 5 years since they’ve had an increase.

Although dental consultants strongly advise yearly increases, many dentists practice in locations where the local economy just won’t support increases due to high unemployment or other regional factors.

“I have a shrinking profit margin. Many of my patients have reduced or no income due to the recession and hurricane Sandy. If I raise my fees I believe fewer patients will accept treatment.” Dentist in the northeast

“I used to raise my fees every 1 to 2 years without fail. But with the economy as it has been the last few years, it has been tough to do.” Illinois Dentist

“With the economy as it is and the number of people out of work, I find it hard to raise my fees. People just cannot afford good dental care. They put off any dental work until an emergency arises.” New York Dentist

“I fell off the wagon during the recession of 07/08, but I’m back on track with yearly adjustments.” South Carolina Dentist

When was the last time you raised your dental fees?

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