Dental Implants: What Do Dentists Charge?

dental implants surveyIn this survey, we asked dentists what was the average cost for dental implants. Dentists reported an average of $1,559 from a general dentist, and $1,853 from a specialist.

“It needs to be less expensive,” complained a Missouri dentist.

“I wish surgical fees for implants weren’t as steep as they are,” said a Washington dentist. “The price point seems to prevent a good share of my patients from receiving the service.”

Here are some other comments from dentists on dental implants:

“We charge $1,750 for first implant then $1,200 for additional implants placed at the same time.” (New York dentist)

“I am a general dentist who places implants. If I place the implant, I charge for the crown — not the abutment. If I send the case to the surgeon, then I charge for the abutment and the crown.” (Georgia dentist)

“I bill out implant, abutment-type and crown-type all separately.” (Colorado dentist)

“I do ceramic (zirconium) implants. They are more bio-compatible and more esthetic. I charge $3800/implant, but for the implant itself is $600.” (General dentist)

“I find that it is easier to restore, but are some dentists charging more than $850?” (Florida dentist)

How Dentists Feel About Dental Peer Reviews (video)

How Dentists Feel About Dental Peer Reviews (video)When there is a conflict between dentist and patient, peer-review boards often mediate the dispute.

This means that dentists frequently end up on the losing side of the peer review equation.

Said one dentist, “Review boards are not impartial and fair, just interested in giving money back to patients.”

One endodontist professed, “It’s far better that getting involved in the judicial system!”

These are just two of the comments dentists offered The Wealthy Dentist when surveyed about the dental peer-review process.

Click on Play to hear more from dentists on how they answered the survey question: Have you been disappointed by dental peer-review?

What are your thoughts on dental peer-reviews?

Dentist Thinks All Dentists Should Drop Dental Insurance (video)

Dentist Thinks All Dentists Should Drop Dental Insurance (video)Dental insurance is a great way to bring in new dental patients, but it is also a great way to reduce a dental practice’s bottom line and give dentists less control over their dental practice.

Explained one endodontist, “If I dropped dental insurance I’d be cutting ties to 85% of my patient base!”

Another doctor suggested, “If all dentists dropped all insurances, then all dentists could collect fees in full from everyone!”

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey asking dentists if they have dropped dental insurance.  Many dentists responded that they are sick and tired of dental insurance companies dictating fees and treatments, leaving a number of them wanting to drop their dental health plans.

To hear more of what dentists had to say about dropping dental insurance, Click Play —

What are your thoughts on dental insurance?

How Dentists Deal With Dental Practice Burnout (video)

How Dentists Deal With Dental Burnout (video)It has been argued that dentistry can be a stressful occupation.

Possible root causes are demanding patient interactions, negative perceptions about dentistry, financial pressures from running a dental practice, challenging workloads, ever-changing new dental technologies, and lack of resources needed to create change.

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey to ask dentists if they have ever suffered from professional burnout.

A Massachusetts dentist responded, “Burnout to me is mainly the result of negative light in which most people view the dental office experience.”

4 out of 5 dentists in this survey answered that they have experienced professional burnout in their dental careers.

One dentist offered his solution to avoiding burnout, “Taking continuing education courses to learn and improve technologies rejuvenates my dental practice. It keeps me fresh.”

To hear more of what dentists had to say about professional burnout, Click Play to watch the following video:

Have you experienced burnout with your dental career?

For more information about burnout see: Dental Practice Burnout: 5 Symptoms and 5 Remedies

Average Dentist Spends 75 Hours Annually on Continuing Education

Dental Continuing Education Is an Important Part of Dentistry

In our most recent survey, we asked dentists how many hours of formal continuing education they log in an average year. The mean response was 75 hours per year, more than enough to meet state requirements. Interestingly, general dentists reported more CE hours than did specialists.

“More continuing should be required,” wrote a Georgia dentist who logs 200 hours/year. A Michigan orthodontist (logging 120 hours/year) agreed: “The orthodontic world is exploding with information and the state CE requirement is 20 hours a year. Hopelessly inadequate!”

“I’m a CE junkie,” said a Tennessee dentist boasting 150 hours a year. “I also chase extraneous awards and distinctions from various organizations.”

Check out the full results of our dental continuing education survey for more data and comments from dentists.

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