Dentists: Are Dental Hygienists Worth Their Weight in Gold?(video)

Dentists: Are Dental Hygienists Worth Their Weight in Gold?(video)In our story, Dental Hygienists Among the Fastest Growing Occupations in the U.S. we revealed that the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook for 2008-2018 expects the demand to hire more hygienists to perform preventive dental care will continue to grow.

According to the ADA, independent dentists reported paying full-time dental hygienists $33.90 per hour in 2008.

Considering the current economic environment The Wealthy Dentist decided to conduct a survey asking dentists if they pay their hygienists an hourly wage or if compensation is based on commission.

It seems most dentists still pay their dental hygienists an hourly wage, but some feel paying on commission is more fair. Said one dentist, “Hygienists are worth their weight in gold!” Another dentist disagreed saying, “Practices couldn’t run without them, but the current economics barely breaks even at best … hygienists seem to think they are cash cows for the office and fail to recognize the support and facilities the utilize.”

It’s an interesting economic issue. Click on Play to hear more of what dentists say about paying hygienists —

How do you pay the hygienist in your practice?

The Most Important Dental Marketing Vector

The Most Important Dental Marketing Vector: Internal MarketingIn a recent The Wealthy Dentist survey, the respondents pointed to internal marketing as their most important dental marketing vector.

As dental practices have been forced to focus on increasing dental practice revenue, one of the key components, it seems, has been internal marketing.

Internal marketing relies on dental patient referrals. If the dental practice lacks in quality customer service, or does not build strong dentist-patient relationships, then any attempts at internal marketing will likely fall flat.

In the most recent the Wealthy Dentist survey we asked dentists what is the most important marketing vector for their dental practice.

67% of the dentist respondents answered that internal marketing is their most important dental marketing vector. 19% responded that Internet dental marketing is their most important marketing vector. 7% felt direct mail marketing was the most beneficial, while another 7% felt traditional media like newspaper, TV and radio were the most important.

Here are some of the comments we received from dentists on this survey:

“Internet and internal marketing are neck-and-neck, followed by direct-mail marketing.” (Arizona dentist)

“Internal marketing and word-of-mouth clearly bring in the BEST new patients for us. We receive the most new patients from Internet and direct-mail marketing. Printed dental phone book marketing is fast becoming one of the least important marketing vectors for us because the return on investment is getting smaller and smaller.” (Ohio prosthodontist)

“How do you define important? The internal is the the most important, but the Internet brings most of our new dental patients.” (General dentist)

“Direct mail marketing but with more of a focus on growing online marketing.” (Minnesota dentist)

“Word-of-mouth marketing, with the Internet a close second.” (North Carolina dentist)

“Internal marketing followed by our dental website.” (Pediatric dentist)

“If you treat your dental patients like you would treat your family, then the best ‘marketing’ or good word-of-mouth takes care of itself! We really only market our dental practice by being active in our community and being very good to our patients and we get about 30 new patients every month.” (Alabama dentist)

“The newspaper works well in conjunction with our website and TV advertising.” (California dentist)

Internet dental marketing, but it should be referral from other patients and that does not seem to be happening.” (Illinois dentist)

“Word-of-mouth is always number one and under that would be focused direct mail marketing, although Internet marketing is catching up but the quality of dental patient seems to be always less.” (General dentist)

“Our website.” (California orthodontist)

While there are many dental marketing vectors, they have to be utilized properly to get the desired results. Remember, quality dental marketing combined with a quality dental practice are critical to implementing a successful dental marketing program.

Together, they will grow your dental practice, which ultimately leads to more dental referrals and greater profitability in the long run.

internal dental marketing and communications campaign

Check out The Wealthy Dentist’s full internal dental marketing and communications campaign for a 4-phase program designed to add 10 additional patients per month to your practice.

Dentists: Has Tooth Whitening Gone Too Far? (video)

tooth whitening gone too farTooth whitening treatments have become one of the most frequently performed cosmetic dental services.

According to the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, Americans spend more than $1.4 billion on over-the-counter teeth whitening products.

But has the quest for blindingly white teeth gone too far?

One prosthodontist complained to The Wealthy Dentist, “Too many people have the Regis Philbin look: teeth that are too big and too white that look fake!”

In the following survey video we asked dentists about the subject of tooth whitening and here’s what they had to say –

What do you think? Has tooth whitening gone too far?

Dental Botox is Big Business These Days (video)

Americans spent $1.9 billion on injectable procedures in 2010. Botox™ is big business these days and some dentists are getting in on the action by offering cosmetic Botox™ for their dental patients.

One dentist told The Wealthy Dentist, “I want to do Botox™. I don’t know why we have not started earlier. Who better to give injections than a dentist? We do it all day long. We have great touch. It is a great add-on to all the cosmetics we do!”

In this TWD survey, we asked dentists if cosmetic dentists should offer non-dental cosmetic treatments, such as Botox™ injections.

Click on Play to hear how dentists responded to this dental survey question –

Half of Dentists Use Dental Lasers for Gum Disease (video)

Dental lasers for gum diseaseDentists are split over the use of dental lasers to fight gum disease. When dentists were asked if they use lasers on soft tissue in their dental practices, respondents were split right down the middle.

Half report that lasers are part of their periodontal management, and the other 50% indicate they do not use lasers on soft tissue.

Read more: Dental Lasers Treat Gum Disease

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