Sedation Dentists: What is the Cost of Sedation Dentistry? (video)

cost of sedation dentistryThe Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey that asked dentists about the cost of sedation dentistry.

The cost of sedation dentistry varies widely among dentists. Of course, if you are a dental patient spending thousands for cosmetic dentistry, then sedation fees are just a drop in the bucket.

The average fee for oral conscious sedation is about $300. Some dentists don’t charge, whereas others ask as much as $650.

A third offer IV sedation, charging about $500. But intravenous sedation fees ranged from $250-$800. Only 6% have general anesthesia capabilities. Ranging from $320 to $1200, anesthesia costs around $700.

“My IV sedation fee is based on the amount of time needed to complete dental procedures,” said a Florida pediatric dentist.

“Most of the time I don’t charge for the sedation as these are usually very large (20K plus) cases,” reported a Texas dentist.

To hear more of what dentists had to say about sedation dentistry, please click play and watch the following survey video –

Conscious sedation dentistry helps lower patients’ anxiety and marketing sedation dentistry to the anxious dental patient is a smart way to bring in new dental patients.

What do you charge for oral conscious sedation at your dental practice?

For more on this survey see: Sedation Dentistry: Cost of Peace of Mind

Sedation Dentistry through Hypnosis?

Patient Skips Anesthesia, Undergoes Hypnosis To Have Jaw Drilled At Dentist

Sedation dentistry is big business these days, with patients eager to avoid both dental pain and full dental anesthesia. Could hypnosis be another solution?

A 45-year-old UK woman had her two front teeth replaced with dental implants using no anesthetic whatsoever. Her treatment is the subject of the BBC documentary “Alternative Therapies.”

She was hypnotized by Mike Gow, president of the British Society of Medical and Dental Hypnosis before receiving treatment from a cosmetic dentist. Anesthesia was available should the patient have needed it at any time, but her self-reported pain levels never rose above a three out of a scale of ten. Her pulse also remained steady during her dental implant treatment.

Read more

Dental Marketing: Negative Online Review Appears as a Facebook Page

negative dental page on FacebookIn the past The Wealthy Dentist has written about negative online reviews in such articles as Appeals Court Says Yes to Dentist Lawsuit Against Patient for Online Review andWhen a Dentist’s Relationship Goes Bad on the Internet — both stories about harmful dental critiques posted on review sites like Yelp and Angie’s List.

But in August of this year, Chris Cook of Bakersfield, CA, pushed negative online reviews to a new level.

It was reported in dental news site DrBicuspid.com that Mr.  Cook took his 5-year-old son to see Bakersfield pediatric dentist Edward Dove, DDS, for a tooth extraction. Mr. Cook claims Dr. Dove mistreated his son during that visit by extracting a tooth before the child was adequately sedated.

According to DrBiCuspid.com, Cook stated that his son vomited up most of the sedative, screamed, and urinated on himself while allegedly being held down by three dental assistants during the procedure.  Allegations Dr. Dove vehemently denies.

Chris Cook decided to take matters into his own hands and created the “I Hate Dr. Dove of Bakersfield” page on Facebook, attracting more than 200 members in its first 48 hours.

Luckily for Dr. Dove, Facebook does have a policy for pages with the word “hate” and considers them in strict violation of their terms of service.  They swiftly moved to shut down the dental hate page.

Cook was undaunted by the Facebook boot, turned around and created a second Facebook group page, “Bakersfield dentist DOES NOT ROCK!!!!!!!!!” which is still up and active.

Dr. Dove has handled the situation by defending his treatment in the press and pointing to his 23 years in practice without a single disciplinary action. He has chosen not to engage with Chris Cook on his Facebook page, and was quoted in Dr Bicuspid as saying, “I think my reputation will be hurt a little bit, but right now I just want to calm down,” Dr. Dove said, “This guy is going ballistic, he’s trying to smear me, and I’m getting bullied.”

But should Dr. Dove be more concerned?

Just how significant are bad reviews for the future of your dental practice?

A new survey by market analysis firm Cone, Inc., found that four out of five consumers have reversed purchase decisions based on negative reviews found on the Internet. Another survey by Ratepoint found that 40 percent of consumers indicated they are more likely to consider a local business when they respond to a negative online review.

In the case of a Facebook page being dedicated to hating a dental practice, a dentist has little recourse since the unhappy page creator would have to allow the dentist to join the group page in order to issue a response.

Dentists have had little luck in defamation lawsuits when it comes to negative online reviews since the courts tend to look upon unhappy reviews as free speech. In a recent defamation case in California, a dentist has been ordered to pay $80,000 in attorney fees to the parents who posted a negative online review.

So how do you combat something like a negative Facebook page?

By making sure your dental practice has more than one website that appears on the top pages of Google when your business (and personal) name is searched online. Also have your own Facebook page, or pages for each type of treatment you offer. Have a Twitter page and make sure your practice is listed in as many dental directories as you can find. The idea is to control what appears on the first page of Google about your dental practice. Regular press releases help with this too.

For solutions to multiple name search and directory listing go to: www.InternetDentalAlliance.com.

For more on this story see: Facebook Pulls Plug on Angry Dad’s Antidentist Page

Sedation Dentistry: From Nitrous Oxide to Oral Conscious Sedation and Beyond

Dentists Offer an Array of Dental Sedation Options

Dental Survey Results

When we asked dentists about the highest level of sedation dentistry they offer to their patients, responses were across the board. Some offer full anesthesia; others offer OCS; others offer no sedation services.

General dentists and specialists have markedly different patterns of sedation. Given the more intensive procedures often performed by specialists, it’s not surprising that they offer a higher level of sedation on their patients.

A number of dentists voiced their preference for IV sedation. “It’s the platinum of sedation without side effects,” wrote a prosthodontist. “I would lose over half my practice without dental sedation,” said another dentist. But one dentist worried, “With some of the practitioners I’ve seen, conscious sedation is a catastrophe waiting to happen.”

What else do dentists think about sedation dentistry?

  • “I would lose over half my practice without dental sedation.” (Arkansas dentist)
  • “It makes for really easy visits and incredibly appreciative patients.” (California dentist)
  • “Although sedation seems like a nice thing to have available for your patients, the reality is that it is a real pain to provide! My favorite method of sedation is someone who is able to take just local anesthesia!” (Nevada dentist)
  • “Nitrous sedation is my favorite because of total reversibility.” (California dentist)
  • “I don’t agree with the use of dental sedation.” (Florida dentist)
  • “I think the profession is missing the boat concerning IV sedation….I wouldn’t work without it. Three cases this morning. This is my 40th year using IV.” (General dentist)
  • “I feel too many dentists are treading in an area where they are not well trained.” (Pennsylvania dentist)
  • “I’d love to do more, and I feel hog-tied because of state laws. I spent a lot of time and money to learn about it only to learn that I couldn’t legally do what I was taught.” (Pennsylvania dentist)

Read the complete Sedation Denistry: From Nitrous Oxide to Conscious Sedation to Anesthesia survey results

General Dental Patients Are the Most Profitable For Dentists

General Dental Patients Are the Most Profitable For DentistsFor most dental practices, a certain percentage of dental patients drive the majority of profits.

But you might be surprised to learn that the more extensive dental treatment patients may not necessarily be the best profit-drivers.

It’s important for dentists to know what type of dental patients are the most profitable to their dental practice. In studying what makes this group profitable, dentists can apply what they discover to other dental patients.

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey asking dentists which type of dental patients they find are the most profitable for their dental practice.

34% of dentists responded, “General dental patients are always the core (profits)!”

Here’s a breakdown of the rest of the dentist’s responses —

24% Dental implant patients
18% Cosmetic dentistry patients
11% Sedation dentistry patients
09% Braces patients
02% Dentures patients
02% Other

Here are some comments from our dentists:

“Our most profitable patients are those that pay in full before treatment begins.” (Texas dentist)

“Dental implant patients seem to always pay on time.” (Ohio prosthodontist)

“Patients who pay in full and refer other patients.” (General dentist)

“Sedation patients are the most profitable.” (California dentist)

“Cosmetic patients who want to replace amalgam with a more esthetic composite.” (Arizona dentist)

General dental patients have long been the most profitable type of dental patient for dentists, is this true of your dental practice?

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