Invisalign Creates Greater Profits for Orthodontists

Invisalign Creates Greater Profits for OrthodontistsIs Invisalign a smarter braces treatment for an orthodontist’s bottom line?

A new study suggests some truth to this by revealing that, while Invisalign clear orthodontic aligners cost more in materials than conventional edgewise braces, they require fewer patient visits and a shorter duration of treatment for dentists.

Researchers reported this finding at the recent American Association for Dental Research annual meeting, according to Medscape News.

Researchers evaluated the records of 150 dental patients with mild to moderate class I malocclusion. The types of orthodontic procedures were matched for the amount of initial malocclusion and the number of rotated teeth.

According to Medscape News, here’s what they found:

Conventional braces required a median of 13.6 minutes for a routine visit, whereas Invisalign required 9.9 minutes. Emergency, initial, and final appointments were all longer than regular visits.

Conventional braces required about 2.6 more visits than Invisalign, treatment for 2.4 months longer, 1.1 more emergency visits, 9.7 minutes more in chair time, 1.2 minutes more emergency doctor time, and 86.2 minutes more in total chair time.

However, Invisalign cost $500 to $1441 more in materials and required 5.9 minutes more doctor time than conventional braces.

Measuring profitability as fees minus the cost of materials, Invisalign was more profitable than conventional braces, the researchers found, especially for Invisalign providers who are charged $899 in lab costs, a discount that the appliance maker, Align, offers to orthodontists who do more cases.

For these doctors, Invisalign provided about $1000 of profit per hour of chair time with the first $2750 in fees to the patient, rising to $3250 with $6000 in fees. Doctors who are charged $1549 in lab costs by Align had a profit of about $500 with the first $2750 in fees, rising to $3000 with $6000 in fees.

Braces were less profitable overall, starting at $750 per hour of chair time with the first $2750 in fees, but reaching only $2000 with $6000 in fees.

Invisalign is clearly the profit-maker when it comes to adding value to an orthodontist’s practice.

For more on this story see: Study Shows Invisalign More Profitable Than Braces

Best Braces Dentist: A Family Dentist or an Orthodontist?

Should GPs do ortho? 74% of general dentists think so, but only 4% of orthodontists agreeIs the best braces dentist a GP or a specialist? It all depends on who you ask.

Three out of four general dentists think it’s appropriate for GPs to do orthodontics, but a mere 4% of orthodontists surveyed agree. In fact, 41% of orthodontists say they’re the ones who should be doing virtually all ortho work.

“The training is often minimal and results often are not retained,” said one dentist. “I just think it is better to leave the specialties to the specialists.”Should general dentists do ortho?

Here are some dentist comments on general dentists and orthodontics.

  • “Case selection is critical and should be based upon the knowledge and skill of the GP.” (Florida dentist)
  • “Some orthodontists resent GPs doing their own ortho. Why is that? I have never met a single oral surgeon, endodontist, or prosthodontist that had a problem with my practice desires. It could be a matter of greed or pride. You make the call.” (Georgia dentist)
  • “Those who are doing it hopefully have a good lawyer on their side.” (Kentucky dental implant dentist)
  • Invisalign is becoming the latest malpractice issue. Too many GPs are doing it and getting into trouble!” (Florida dentist)
  • “General dentists don’t have the proper knowledge to perform orthodontics. ‘Little knowledge is dangerous.'” (New York dentist)
  • “Would you send your wife to a family physician for her brain surgery?” (Orthodontist)
  • “As long as they stay within their level of training and they refer when appropriate.” (Texas pediatric dentist)
  • “The quality of GP ortho is directly related to the quality and quantity of the dental CE. Most GP ortho CE courses are cursory and superficial. Only one or two are a true continuum that mimics an ortho residency.” (Alaska dentist)
  • “Diagnosis is the most difficult part. Once you have the background, the rest is easy.” (New York dentist)
  • “With proper training, any GP should be able to perform any procedure, whether it is endo, ortho, dental implants, etc.” (Prosthodontist)
  • “Every orthodontist is being asked to help or bail out GP cases as they often underestimate the complexity of cases and or are tackling more complex cases than they should due to economic pressures.” (California orthodontist)
  • “GPs see relapse on a regular basis after ‘specialist’ treatment.” (Maryland dentist)
  • “No different than a GP doing endodontics, prosthodontics, pedodontics, oral surgery or perio.” (Florida pediatric dentist)
  • “Bad ortho can ruin a patient’s dentition.” (Georgia periodontist)
  • “It’s not rocket science.” (Australia dentist)

Read more about dental braces: General Dentists Do Orthodontics, But Orthodontists Aren’t Sure They Should

Dental Marketing Dilemma: Orthodontist in Local Newspaper

Dental marketing dilemma: bad press in newspaperWhen it comes to dental marketing, not all press is good press. Just ask the orthodontist who was recently featured in the Chicago Tribune’s “What’s Your Problem?” section.

The newspaper has recently covered a mother’s plight to have her son’s braces removed.

According to the woman, the orthodontist refused to remove the teen’s braces until the family settled a mysterious $300 bill for missed visits. Her two daughters had seen the same doctor, and the family had paid the orthodontic practice a total of about $12,000 over the years.

The dispute occurred in January, and involved the office filing a police report against the mother (for charges she denies). She contacted the newspaper in July. Now that it’s been featured in the paper, the boy’s dental braces are off.

The orthodontist expressed bewilderment over the whole thing. According to the practice, there is no $300 balance due, and the boy would have been welcome in at any time.

It’s not clear what really happened – but it is clear that the orthodontist doesn’t come out looking so good in the local paper!

Read more: Mom not smiling over dental dispute

Orthodontist Sued for Missing a Cancerous Lesion

Should Orthodontists Be Held Liable for Missing a Cancerous Lesion?

Lawsuits can strike fear in the hearts of dentists – not only for the costs involved, but for the damage they inflict on a dentist’s reputation that has taken a lifetime to build.

Where does liability end and common sense begin?

Recently the NY state court found that orthodontist Dr. Michael Donato was not negligent in the death of former patient Stephanie Hare. Ms. Hare’s family held Dr. Donato responsible for Stephanie’s death due to failing to detect a cancerous lesion during a December 2003 visit.

In April 2004, a lump was detected on her tongue by Dr. Donato, who ultimately referred her to an oral surgeon. But by then, the cancer was in its advanced stages. She died seven months later.

The family was seeking a $2.3 million award from Dr. Donato for pain and suffering.

The case pivoted around whether jurors would believe the cancerous lesion was present on Dec. 19, 2003 when Ms. Hare’s family said she complained of soreness to Dr. Donato; whether Dr. Donato should have found the lesion during a routine orthodontist examination; and whether he followed standard dental care during the exam.

“Stephanie’s death was not anybody’s fault,” Dr. Donato’s lawyer, Douglas Fitzmorris, told jurors in his summation. “Stephanie died of cancer. Dr. Donato is not to blame. The whole specter of this lesion being missed by Dr. Donato is not what happened. There was no deviation from accepted practice.”

And the jury agreed with Fitzmorris’ assessment of the case.

Should an orthodontist be held liable if he misses a cancerous legion? What if the patient’s complaints sound like issues stemming from braces and not cancer?

For more on this story, see Staten Island Advance.

The Average Cost of Braces: Orthodontists Charge More (video)

braces cost more from orthodontists videoThe Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey that asked dentists what they charge for braces, and how much dental braces cost on average. This survey found that general dentists charge an average of $5,040 for orthodontic work, while orthodontists charge about $5,600 dollars.

The cost of braces tends to be higher that what patients want to pay and lower than what dentists want to receive.

A Washington orthodontist wrote, “Over the past thirty years, the cost of braces has kept pace with cost of living increases. Thankfully, technology has allowed greater efficiency and consequently, reasonable profitability for the orthodontist and a good price for the consumer.”

Click on play to watch the video –

  • Do different orthodontic treatments cost different amounts?

Yes, but less than you might think. Adult braces and Invisalign costs were about equal in this survey. Teen braces (on average) cost a few hundred dollars more.

  • Are prices the same across the US?

You will find the most affordable braces in the American west. Dental braces cost the most in the Northeast, the Pacific and Canada. The reason is simply regional price differences.

For more on this survey see: Braces Cost More from an Orthodontist

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