implants Archives - The Wealthy Dentist

Cosmetic Dentistry Is Dentists’ Favorite Treatment Option

Dental Implants & Sedation Dentistry Are Also Popular

Dental Survey ResultsIn our most recent survey, we asked dentists about their favorite treatment options. Cosmetic dentistry was the clear winner, pulling in over one-third of the total vote (and one-half of he general dentist vote). Dental implants were the runner-up.

There were distinct differences between general dentists and specialists. While nearly half of general dentists favored cosmetic dentistry, only 16% of specialists did. Among specialists, dental implants were the favorite treatment option.

There were also notable differences between urban and rural dentists. Rural dentists were significantly more likely to vote for cosmetic dentistry as their favorite option. While Invisalign was preferred by one-quarter of urban dentists, no rural dentists reported feeling the same way.

Here are some other treatment options dentists like:

  • “Lasers.” (Maryland dentist)
  • “Periodontal plastic surgery.” (Arizona periodontist)
  • “Amalgam.” (North Carolina dentist)
  • “Conventional orthodontics.” (Michigan dentist)
  • “Third molars.” (New York dentist)
  • “Crowns and bridges.” (Canada dentist)
  • “Reconstructive dentistry.” (Kentucky dentist)
  • “Endodontics.” (Canada dentist)
  • “TMD.” (Michigan dentist)
  • “Smile makeovers.” (Cosmetic dentist)

Post your comments or read the complete dental treatment options survey results…

Introducing The Latest In Dental Controversy: Mini Dental Implants (video)

mini dental implantsMini dental implants newer than traditional implants and they’re more controversial too, with 24% of dentists reporting that they never recommend mini dental implants for their dental patients.

Some doctors love mini implants, while others think they are an inherently inferior product.

Watch this dental survey video below for more on mini dental implants and how doctors feel about them –

Survey: What Questions Do Patients Ask About Dental Implants?

top 5 questions patients ask about implantsWe conducted a survey that asked dentists what questions dental patients ask when considering getting implants. It turns out that there’s a real difference between the questions dental implant patients do ask — and which questions they should be asking.

Dentists responded with the following . . .

The top 5 questions dental patients ask –

  1. How much do dental implants cost?
  2. How long do dental implants last?
  3. Are implants painful?
  4. How long will it take to get my new teeth?
  5. Does dental insurance cover implant surgery?

Versus . . .

The top 5 questions dentists want patients to ask –

  1. Am I a good candidate for implants?
  2. What are the potential complications of dental implant therapy?
  3. How much implant experience does the doctor have?
  4. What is the healing time for my implants?
  5. Can implants improve my appearance?

Many dental implant patients seem to have the same questions about dental implant therapy. Unfortunately, these questions aren’t necessarily the ones dentists think they should be asking.

The 2 main questions patients ask are –

  1. How much do dental implants cost?
  2. Will dental implant surgery be painful?

When dentists feel their very first question should be –

  1. Am I a good candidate for dental implants?

There is really a disconnect between the doctor and patient. This is no surprise, since patients are thinking about how they are going to pay for the implants, and whether the procedure will be painful.

But doctors can’t afford not to address the primary concerns of the patient first: cost and pain.

One dentist wrote, “Long term, when the conditions are favorable, proper bone density, height and width, proper biomechanical considerations, proper occlusal load. A dental implant is more cost effective over a 3 unit bridge. However, when the above conditions are not meet — the 3 unit bridge (with sufficient ferule, impressions taken with custom made tray and properly impressioned, properly articulated, preprosthetic endodontic treatment performed by an endodontist, core-restoration — not in composite) will be more cost effective (for the patient).”

Read more: Dental Implant Questions for the Dentist

Dental Implant Success Depends on Oral Surgeon and Patient

Dental Implant Success Depends on Oral Surgeon and PatientThe Journal of Oral Implantology has released the findings of a 10-year study evaluating the success of implant-supported, fixed complete dentures.

According to the Journal, the aim of the study was to evaluate the predictability of the immediate loading protocol with fast bone regeneration (FBR)-coated implants placed in postextractive sites in the maxilla, considering the success rate after at least 5 years of follow-up.

The clinical and radiographic results were evaluated in terms of soft tissue conditions and crestal bone loss values. 158 dental implants were inserted following dental extraction in 70 consecutively operated patients.

Each implant was immediately prosthesized. Data was collected before surgical planning, at the time of insertion, and after 3 and 5 years of occlusal loading.

The study, “Long-Term Results of Immediately Loaded Fast Bone Regeneration–Coated Implants Placed in Fresh Extraction Sites in the Upper Jaw” revealed that certain characteristics of both the patient and the oral surgeon performing the procedure determined the success rate of the dental implant procedures.

Two dental patient risk factors increased the likelihood of dental implant failure: bruxism and diabetes. Implant failure occurred in 29% of the patients with bruxizm and over 28% of the patients with diabetes. Higher implant failures also occurred with newer oral surgeons who had performed 50 implant procedures or less. Interestingly, the effect of smoking was not a risk factor in the study.

The use of immediately loaded FBR-coated implants in fresh extraction sockets is shown to be a predictable technique if implants are inserted in selected cases and positioned with great care, following thorough preoperative analysis. (American Academy of Implant Dentistry).

The study reported a 90% success rate for implant-supported fixed dentures.

To review the report see: American Academy of Implant Dentistry

Dental Implants Abroad: When Dental Tourism Goes Bad

Dental Implants Abroad: When Dental Tourism Goes Bad  Summer is the busiest season for dental tourism.

Statistics on this trend are hard to come by, but it is estimated that each year over one million people from around the world travel outside their country for some form of dental treatment.

While filling a cavity might be a simple dental procedure to have abroad, dental implants and more complicated dental treatments may not be as straightforward.

Dental implants can be a particularly risky dental treatment to receive abroad due to the recuperation period needed and follow-up appointments.

Just ask Palm Coast, Florida, resident Helen Hyjek, who recently traveled to Costa Rica for dental implant treatment.

According to WFTV News in Florida, Hyjeck received both upper and lower implants while on a planned dental vacation to Costa Rica. But once she returned home she found that her implants were too big, which caused her gums to continually bleed. She is in constant pain and has returned three times to Costa Rica in an attempt to get her implant issues fixed — all to no avail.

Meanwhile Hyject has spent in excess of $15,000 dollars in her efforts to save costs on what is typically considered an expensive dental procedure by dental patients here in the U.S. She doesn’t have the money to fix what has gone wrong and says the implants sound like “nails to a chalkboard.”

The ADA advises that dental patients who are considering dental treatments outside of the U.S. look at optimal oral health and costs versus the perceived value of dental tourism.  The ADA further warns of the potential difficulty in seeking redress if problems are encountered with dental treatments performed in a foreign country, which is exactly what Helen Hyjeck is now experiencing.

Dentists, have you had to repair dental implant treatments that were performed by a dental professional outside of the U.S.?

For more on this story see: Woman Shares Medical Tourism Dental Nightmare

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