Cosmetic Dentistry Is Dentists’ Favorite Treatment Option

Dental Implants & Sedation Dentistry Are Also Popular

Dental Survey ResultsIn our most recent survey, we asked dentists about their favorite treatment options. Cosmetic dentistry was the clear winner, pulling in over one-third of the total vote (and one-half of he general dentist vote). Dental implants were the runner-up.

There were distinct differences between general dentists and specialists. While nearly half of general dentists favored cosmetic dentistry, only 16% of specialists did. Among specialists, dental implants were the favorite treatment option.

There were also notable differences between urban and rural dentists. Rural dentists were significantly more likely to vote for cosmetic dentistry as their favorite option. While Invisalign was preferred by one-quarter of urban dentists, no rural dentists reported feeling the same way.

Here are some other treatment options dentists like:

  • “Lasers.” (Maryland dentist)
  • “Periodontal plastic surgery.” (Arizona periodontist)
  • “Amalgam.” (North Carolina dentist)
  • “Conventional orthodontics.” (Michigan dentist)
  • “Third molars.” (New York dentist)
  • “Crowns and bridges.” (Canada dentist)
  • “Reconstructive dentistry.” (Kentucky dentist)
  • “Endodontics.” (Canada dentist)
  • “TMD.” (Michigan dentist)
  • “Smile makeovers.” (Cosmetic dentist)

Post your comments or read the complete dental treatment options survey results…

Dental Implants Belong to the General Dentist

Dental implants as a dentist specialtyShould dental implants should be a formal dental specialty? Three of four dentists (77%) say no.

“I don’t think it is necessary to make this a specialty since oral surgeons, periodontists, prosthodontists and general dentists like me all place dental implants, and many restore,” offered one doctor. “I do think fellowship training is good, and credentialing is valuable.”

Though 85% of general dentists oppose having implant dentistry as an official specialty, only 67% of specialists feel the same. While some feel that dental implant surgery should only be done by a specialist, most agree that general dentists are fully capable of restoring implants.

Here are some further comments from dentists on dental implantology:

  • “The oral surgeons or periodontists should be placing the implants in the bone – a good restorative dentist can place the dental implant crowns or over- dentures.” (Florida dentist)
  • “I do not believe dentists should be placing tooth implants unless they are certified specialists in implantology.” (Alabama dentist)
  • “It IS a specialty when done at the highest levels.” (Dental implantologist)
  • “Implant dentistry should become a subspecialty recognizing those doctors (specialists and non specialists alike) that have received additional training to perform tooth implant dentistry proficiently.” (Periodontist)
  • “Implants are a part of my General Practice, and have been since 1986. I would hate to see certain fractions in dentistry fight over this….i.e., Oral Surgeons, Periodontist, dentists, etc. It WILL be ugly.” (Massachusetts dentist)
  • “Implants should be dental school course just as endodontics, periodontics, etc.” (General dentist)
  • “The last thing dentistry needs.” (New Jersey dentist)
  • “There are enough turf wars about dental implants as it is. No need to have a separate specialty.” (General dentist)
  • “The politics of delineating who the ‘specialists’ are is an impossible task.” (New York prosthodontist)
  • “Things are good as they are. We should not elevate individuals to royalty status.” (Texas dentist)

Read more: Dental Implants Should Not Be a Specialty, Say Dentists

Implant Dentistry Advertising Is Held Hostage by Texas Regulations

Implant Dentistry Advertising Is Held Hostage by Texas RegulationsDental implants are fast becoming the choice dental tool for the replacement of a missing tooth or teeth.

And the growing global demand for better oral aesthetics has driven an increase in the number of dentists performing dental implant surgeries.

But quietly, behind the scenes, states have been attempting to regulate how dentists can advertise their dental implant dentistry credentials.

Last week, the American Academy of Implant Dentistry (AAID) filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Austin, Texas seeking to invalidate a Texas regulation that severely restricts dentists from advertising their AAID credentials in implant dentistry, according to prnewswire.

In 2009 and 2010, AAID won judicial verdicts overturning similar rules enforced by state dental boards in Florida and California.

AAID’s chief legal counsel, Frank Recker, JD, DDS, informed the Texas Board of Dental Examiners in writing about the unequivocal judicial precedents and hoped to convince the Board to rescind its restrictions and avoid litigation. “The Board did not respond to our communications for two years. Since AAID’s credentialed members continue to be in jeopardy if they advertise their credentials, the Academy decided to pursue legal action,” said Recker.

Two Texas dentists holding AAID’s dental implant credentials, Dr. Jay Elliott of Houston and Dr. Monty Buck of Galveston, joined the lawsuit as individual co-plaintiffs.

AAID is seeking a permanent injunction and declaratory judgment to strike down the Texas regulation, which allows unrestricted advertising only for dental credentials and accreditations issued by organizations recognized as dental specialties by the American Dental Association (ADA). Dentists with bona fide credentials not issued by ADA-recognized specialty organizations are required to include lengthy disclaimers in their advertising in Texas.

This limitation, contends AAID, is burdensome and prohibits dentists from advertising true statements about credentials in implant dentistry earned from AAID and American Board of Oral Implantology (ABOI).

In Florida and California, the presiding judges ruled that such advertising restrictions violate the First and Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution, which protect freedom of speech and equal protection of the laws. Recker said the legal precedents solidly favor AAID and Drs. Elliott and Buck. Go get ’em guys!

“Consumers in Texas have no ready means of learning which dentists practicing in their state have significant substantive training in implant dentistry,” said Recker. “Awareness of AAID’s dental implant credential provides consumers with objectively verifiable information regarding a dentist’s knowledge, proficiency and experience. The Texas advertising restriction prevents highly qualified implant dentists from differentiating their training and education.”

Recker added that, in Texas, dentists with no training in placing implants are permitted to engage in implant dentistry and advertise that they perform this service. This makes it almost impossible for consumers to objectively evaluate a dentist’s qualifications to perform implant procedures.

Let’s be honest here folks, the average consumer can’t evaluate a politician, let alone a dentist.

In the 2009 Florida decision, Circuit Court Judge Frank E. Sheffield ruled that a state law restricting how dentists can advertise credentials issued by bona fide professional organizations is unconstitutional. The Florida statute prevented advertising of membership in or credentials earned from any dental organization not recognized by the Florida Board of Dentistry (FDB). Florida’s dental board only recognized specialty credentials issued by the ADA.

Dentists who wanted to advertise their AAID credentials had to include an onerous disclaimer that implant dentistry is not a recognized specialty of ADA or the FDB and that AAID is not a recognized specialty accrediting organization.

The Court decided the advertising restrictions were unconstitutional on many grounds. They violated the Florida constitution’s guarantee of the right to be rewarded for industry or professional achievement and First and Fourteenth Amendment rights of free speech and equal protection of the law.

In a clear and unequivocal verdict issued in 2010, Judge John Mendez, writing for the United States District Court for the Eastern District of California, ruled that credentials issued to dentists by AAID are bona fide and legitimate, and state laws that prohibit or restrict advertising them to the public are unconstitutional.

He struck down a state law that effectively prevented dentists from advertising credentials issued by AAID and said that AAID and the American Board of Oral Implantology (ABOI) “are bona fide credentialing organizations whose standards are rigorous, objectively clear, and verifiable.”

The Texas Board for Dental Examiners has not responded publicly yet to the AAID’s legal action.

What are your thoughts on dentists advertising their AAID credentials in implant dentistry?

Source: American Academy of Implant Dentistry

Dental Implants: A Survey of Dentists (video)

Dental Implants: A Survey of Dentists (video)Prosthodontists, periodontists and oral surgeons do all the dental implants, but so do general dentists.

Specialists claim that they are more qualified to place implants, but a lot of general dentists also place implants.

Due to the exponential growth in the placement of dental implants in recent years, The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey asking dentists if they place their own dental implants.

About half of general dentists place dental implants. In this survey, 53% of general dentists said they do dental implant placement themselves.

“I pick and choose,” said a Virginia prosthodontist. “Those patients who need a more complex treatment are referred to our in-house oral surgeon or periodontists.”

“Every general dentist who can extract a tooth can do most dental implant surgery,” said an Oregon general dentist. “I feel that oral surgeons really do not want you to know how easy it is to do. All dentists owe it to themselves and to their patients. I restore 75% more tooth implants now because I am placing my own. The acceptance was astonishing.”

To hear more of what dentists had to say about dentists placing dental implants, Click on Play to watch the following video:



What are your thoughts on dentists placing dental implants?  Are you placing implants at your dental practice?

Dental Implants Abroad: When Dental Tourism Goes Bad

Dental Implants Abroad: When Dental Tourism Goes Bad  Summer is the busiest season for dental tourism.

Statistics on this trend are hard to come by, but it is estimated that each year over one million people from around the world travel outside their country for some form of dental treatment.

While filling a cavity might be a simple dental procedure to have abroad, dental implants and more complicated dental treatments may not be as straightforward.

Dental implants can be a particularly risky dental treatment to receive abroad due to the recuperation period needed and follow-up appointments.

Just ask Palm Coast, Florida, resident Helen Hyjek, who recently traveled to Costa Rica for dental implant treatment.

According to WFTV News in Florida, Hyjeck received both upper and lower implants while on a planned dental vacation to Costa Rica. But once she returned home she found that her implants were too big, which caused her gums to continually bleed. She is in constant pain and has returned three times to Costa Rica in an attempt to get her implant issues fixed — all to no avail.

Meanwhile Hyject has spent in excess of $15,000 dollars in her efforts to save costs on what is typically considered an expensive dental procedure by dental patients here in the U.S. She doesn’t have the money to fix what has gone wrong and says the implants sound like “nails to a chalkboard.”

The ADA advises that dental patients who are considering dental treatments outside of the U.S. look at optimal oral health and costs versus the perceived value of dental tourism.  The ADA further warns of the potential difficulty in seeking redress if problems are encountered with dental treatments performed in a foreign country, which is exactly what Helen Hyjeck is now experiencing.

Dentists, have you had to repair dental implant treatments that were performed by a dental professional outside of the U.S.?

For more on this story see: Woman Shares Medical Tourism Dental Nightmare

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