Deep Periodontal Cleaning Costs About $225 per Quadrant

Cost of periodontal treatmentWhen we asked dentists about their average fee for one quadrant of deep perio cleaning, the answer was about $225. Full-mouth debridement costs, on average, about $175.

“There is some abuse of this code, making it harder for our office to get reimbursement from third party providers,” said a periodontist.

Cost of periodontal cleaningNot surprisingly, a periodontal cleaning costs somewhat more from a periodontist than a general dentist.

Here are some comments from dentists and periodontists:

  • “Doing this in conjunction with a Laser gets better results.” (California dentist)
  • “It’s easy money done in conjunction with quadrant dentistry.” (District of Columbia dentist)
  • “There is room for adjusting that default fee – number of teeth, difficulty of patient compliance, etc.” (Oklahoma dentist)
  • “Full moth debridement is only rarely used the way the code is written and is (ab)used by dentists as a code for a ‘difficult prophy.’ It is a code that should be changed or deleted.” (Indiana periodontist)
  • “We need a code or severity grading of the ‘prophy’… There has to be some indication of conditions somewhat between relative health and full-blown disease.” (Maryland dentist)
  • “This may not be definitive care for a periodontal inflammatory periodontal response (acute or chronic) and is only of value in an overall treatment plan of reevaluation.” (Ohio periodontist)
  • “With completion of 4 quads of scaling and root planing we give a Sonicare toothbrush.” (Texas dentist)

Read more: Cost of Periodontal Cleaning for Gum Disease

One Dentist in Two Fights Gum Disease with Dental Lasers (video)

Dental lasers for gum diseaseHalf of dentists use dental lasers to fight gum disease, while the other 50% do not use lasers on soft tissue.

“Lasers enable early, effective and efficient Interceptive Treatment for periodontal disease!” raved one dentist. “They are priceless when used properly!”

“I am on my fifth laser and been using them for the last 17 years,” said a periodontist.

A dental implant dentist disagreed, saying, “The cost/benefit ratio seems unreasonable with lasers; my choice is the electro-surge.”

Read more: Dentists Use Dental Lasers To Treat Gum Disease

Gum Disease Risk Analyzed Via Genetic Test

Genetic test for gum disease risk: research studyWhat if a person’s genes could be used to predict their risk for gum disease? A new study at the University of Michigan will examine just that issue.

Genetic testing will be done on some 4,000 patients, and the data will be correlated with levels of tooth loss and periodontal disease.

Genetics has been shown to play a role in gingivitis. It is thought that certain gene variants can cause proteins to be overexpressed, leading soft tissue to detach from bone, and correlating with periodontal problems like bleeding gums, periodontitis, and eventual loss of teeth.

Read more: Genetic test to help predict gum disease

Gum Disease Rates Far Higher Than Previously Estimated

Periodontal disease in the USAGum disease in the US may be as much as 50% more common than previously thought, according to new research from the CDC and American Academy of Periodontology (AAP).

A pilot study of 450 American adults found significantly higher levels of periodontal disease than expected.

Previous estimates of periodontitis in the US relied on partial-mouth examinations. When full-mouth periodontal exams were conducted instead, researchers discovered significantly more perio disease, leading them to suspect that previous estimates may have underestimated the population’s level of gum disease by up to 50%.

Read more: Gum Disease Found to be Significant Public Health Concern

Menopausal Patients Linked to Increased Risk for Gum Disease

menopause and gum diseeaseCase Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine and the Cleveland Clinic say that menopausal women may need to see the dentist as many as four times a year to control dental plaque.

Leena Palomo, an assistant professor of periodontics, and Maria Clarinda Beunocamino-Francisco from the Center for Specialized Women’s Health at the clinic completed a comparison study of women on and off bone-strengthening bisphosphonate therapies for osteoporosis.

In the women they studied, they found a marked increase in dental plaque levels, which could endanger the jawbones of postmenopausal women. (Dental plaque is a biofilm that develops naturally on our teeth. If the plaque is left on teeth too long, it triggers gum disease.)

“Menopausal women at risk for osteoporosis also are at risk for periodontal disease, which affects bone that anchors teeth,” says Palomo. “To keep jawbones strong and healthy,” she added, “means getting rid of the dental plaque by seeing the dentist as many as four times a year for deep periodontal cleanings.”

Do you find that your menopausal patients have more problems with dental plaque than their younger counterparts? What do you recommend to your female patients over 50?

For more on this subject, visit Science Daily.

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