Dentists Support Water Fluoridation (video)

Dentists Support Water Fluoridation (video)The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey asking dentists if they are in favor of water fluoridation.

85% of the dentists who responded to the survey are in favor of fluoridation of drinking water.

Water fluoridation has become a hotly-debated topic in cities throughout the U.S. with Portland, Oregon, being the latest city to consider water fluoridation. Fluoridation is either considered a medical miracle or involuntary mass medication, depending on the dentist you ask.

Said one orthodontist in this survey, “There’s a reason fluoride was rated by one of the top 10 health policies of the 21st century.”

Whereas another dentist declared, “It is forced medication of questionable benefit, and its source is chemical waste from fertilizer processing plants…Yuck!”

To hear what dentists had to say about fluoride, Click on Play —

What are your thoughts on fluoride in drinking water?

Dentists: Is There a Relationship Between Children’s IQ and Fluoride?

Is There a Relationship Between Children's IQ and FluorideWhile Portland, Oregon, the second-largest city in the country without fluoride in the water, is considering adding fluoride to their water supply, a Harvard study has been published stating that fluoride impacts children’s neurodevelopment.

The objective of the Harvard study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies to investigate the effects of increased fluoride exposure and delayed neurobehavioral development.

The researchers searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Water Resources Abstracts, and TOXNET databases through 2011 for eligible studies. They also searched the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) database, as many oral health studies on fluoride neurotoxicity have been published in Chinese journals only.

Lead author Anna Choi, research scientist in the Department of Environmental Health at HSPH, states, “Although fluoride may cause neurotoxicity in animal models and acute fluoride poisoning causes neurotoxicity in adults, very little is known of its effects on children’s neurodevelopment.”

In total, the study identified 27 eligible epidemiological studies with high and reference exposures, endpoints of IQ scores or related cognitive function measures with means and variances for the two exposure groups.

The results of their study reveals that the standardized weighted mean difference in IQ score between exposed and reference populations was -0.45 (95% CI -0.56 to -0.35) using a random-effects model. Thus, children in high fluoride areas had significantly lower IQ scores than those who lived in low fluoride areas. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses also indicated inverse associations, although the substantial heterogeneity did not appear to decrease.

The study reviewed data based on exposure to high water fluoride levels — not levels found in U.S. drinking water, which is less than 1 part per million.

The study was published online in Environmental Health Perspectives on July 20, 2012.

Dentists, do you think there is a relationship between cognitive function and fluoride?

(Source: Developmental Fluoride Neurotoxicity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis)

Science Friday: Calcium Prevents Fluorosis Development in Ethiopia

Science Friday: Calcium Prevents Fluorosis Development in EthiopiaA new Duke University-led study looked at fluoride in the groundwater in the Main Rift Valley of Ethiopia, where as many as 8 million people depend.

They discovered that the residents are at high-risk of dental and skeletal fluorosis as a result of their long-term exposure to high levels of naturally occurring fluoride in the region’s groundwater, according to duke.edu.

By analyzing the groundwater quality in the valley, the study found that as water flows from the surrounding mountains into the valley, where it interacts with volcanic rock, which in turn adds high levels fluoride to the water while also removing most of its calcium.

High levels of fluoride can contribute to tooth decay and dental fluorosis, particularly in children between the ages of 3 months and 8 years.

The new Duke-led study, published online in the journal Environment International (www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412012000530), finds that these efforts “may not be sufficient on their own, because of the region’s geology and the low threshold of exposure at which we found fluorosis was likely to occur,” said Avner Vengosh, professor of geochemistry and water quality at Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment.

Increasing the amount of calcium in villagers’ diets, or finding alternative sources of drinking water may be necessary in addition to these fluoride-reducing treatments.

Water samples from 48 of 50 wells tested in the Main Rift Valley contained fluoride levels six times higher than the World Health Organization safe guidelines of 0.5 to 1.5 mg/litre (milligrams per liter, equivalent to parts per million). The U.S. optimal level of fluoride in drinking water ranges from 0.7 to 1.2 mg/litre.

In some of the communities in the valley, the fluoride levels in their well water were so high that treating the water to cut the fluoride content by half didn’t drop the fluoride levels below the guidelines.

According to the report, most efforts to combat fluorosis in the Main Rift Valley have focused primarily on treating drinking water to reduce its fluoride content.

However, in villages where people had access to milk, the researchers found that severe fluorosis was about 10 percent less likely to occur. Further research is needed to explain this exception, but it may be possible that by injesting milk some of the population received enough calcium to hinder fluorosis development.

An increase in calcium may be key to addressing widespread oral health problems faced by the millions of rural residents in Ethiopia’s remote, poverty-stricken Main Rift Valley.

For more on this story see: Water Treatments Alone Not Enough to Combat Fluorosis in Ethiopia

Science Friday: Fluoride Being Added Back in City Water

Science Friday: Fluoride Being Added Back in City WaterThe City Council of Pinellas Park Florida has unanimously agreed that fluoride should be added back to the city water.

Dentists in the community supported adding fluoride in the public water supply, supporting the ADHA position that “fluoride is an effective, safe, and inexpensive way to prevent tooth decay.”

Dr. Dick Tomlin, a dentist in Pinellas Park for 42 years, said fluoride accounted for a “direct improvement” in his patients’ teeth.

TBNWeekly.com reports that dentist Tomlin was quoted as saying, “I have seen a lot of changes in over three generations of patients. There’s no question in our minds — we have seen a dramatic decrease in the decay in the kids we see. That’s all we’re after.”

TBN states that the fluoride mixture to be added to the water would be kept in bulk storage tanks outside the city’s two pump station. The city plans to maintain fluoride levels in the city water at 0.7 parts per million. Once new storage tanks and other equipment are installed, annual costs would work out to be approximately $1.40 per resident.

For more on this story see: Fluoride to go back in city water

What are your thoughts on the science behind fluoride in city drinking water?

Fluoride Shortage Leaves Dental Community Confused

 

Sorry, We’re All Out of Fluoride: Try Again Next Year

As you well know, water fluoridation is a controversial subject in the dental world: some say it saves peoples’ teeth, whereas detractors fear over-fluoridation does more harm than good. But the debate over whether or not to fluoridate has recently hit a logistical snag in North America: a critical shortage of fluoride supplies.

American manufacturing facilities were damaged when Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast. Dwindling supplies of fluoride have forced a number of US and Canadian cities to revisit their fluoridation strategies. Edmonton, Canada (a city that’s been fluoridating its water since 1967) announced that they have only enough fluoride to last through the fall. American cities such as New Orleans and Portland, Maine, are feeling the heat as well.

Critics of fluoridated water are pleased by the shortage. However, it’s not clear that this momentary shortfall will change the long-term plans of any municipal water supplies. Read more and share your thoughts below…

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