Right or Wrong: San Jose California About to Fluoridate Drinking Water

Right or Wrong: San Jose California About To Fluoridate Drinking WaterThe largest city in U.S. without fluoride, San Jose, is about to add fluoride to their drinking water. The Santa Clara Valley Water District voted on November 15th to support fluoridation to most of the county.

The San Jose Mercury News is reporting that it will be at least a year before the water district can secure funding to add fluoride to the water. The fluoridation project is expected to cost anywhere from $4.4 million to $9.5 million, with annual operating expenses at $836,000.

A 1995 law prohibits water companies from passing fluoridation costs on to rate payers. So both the water district and San Jose Water Company must seek outside methods of providing the capital needed to build the infrastructure necessary to fluoridate the water.

Residents who are against the fluoridation project site fears of dental fluorosis, lowered IQ and raised cancer risks. But the National Cancer Institute supports a February 1991 Public Health Service report, where the agency found no evidence of an association between fluoride and cancer in humans. The report, based on a review of more than 50 human epidemiological (population) studies produced over the past 40 years, concluded that optimal fluoridation of drinking water “does not pose a detectable cancer risk to humans” as evidenced by extensive human epidemiological data reported to date.

Dentist Donald Lyman, of the California Department of Public Health tells The Washington Post, “When you fluoridate the water, childhood tooth decay drops 40 percent and among the elderly, tooth loss and decay drops 70 percent.”

The American Dental Association continues to endorse fluoridation of community water supplies as safe and effective for preventing tooth decay. This support has been the Association’s position since policy was first adopted in 1950. The ADA’s policies regarding community water fluoridation are based on the overwhelming weight of peer-reviewed, credible scientific evidence. The ADA, along with state and local dental societies, continues to work with federal, state and local agencies to increase the number of communities benefiting from water fluoridation. (From the ADA website)

New York City cosmetic dentist and Huffington Post contributor, Thomas P. Connelly, D.D.S. writes, In my years of being a dentist, I’ve found enough to make me feel that fluoride in the water just isn’t worth it. Even if some research is scoffed at, the question itself is enough to make me pause. Especially because I do feel we have enough education on oral health that everyone should be brushing their teeth. And trust me, if you are brushing like you should be (and your dentist is using a topical treatment every so often), then I feel you don’t need fluoride in your water. I’m not a fan of inserting a chemical into our water that most of us simply don’t need to help the few that won’t help themselves.”

What are your thoughts on the use of fluoridation in public water supplies? Leave us a comment or take our most recent survey on fluoridation here.

For more information see: Santa Clara Valley Water District Approves Adding Fluoride to Water in Spite of Objections.

Science Friday: Calcium Prevents Fluorosis Development in Ethiopia

Science Friday: Calcium Prevents Fluorosis Development in EthiopiaA new Duke University-led study looked at fluoride in the groundwater in the Main Rift Valley of Ethiopia, where as many as 8 million people depend.

They discovered that the residents are at high-risk of dental and skeletal fluorosis as a result of their long-term exposure to high levels of naturally occurring fluoride in the region’s groundwater, according to duke.edu.

By analyzing the groundwater quality in the valley, the study found that as water flows from the surrounding mountains into the valley, where it interacts with volcanic rock, which in turn adds high levels fluoride to the water while also removing most of its calcium.

High levels of fluoride can contribute to tooth decay and dental fluorosis, particularly in children between the ages of 3 months and 8 years.

The new Duke-led study, published online in the journal Environment International (www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412012000530), finds that these efforts “may not be sufficient on their own, because of the region’s geology and the low threshold of exposure at which we found fluorosis was likely to occur,” said Avner Vengosh, professor of geochemistry and water quality at Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment.

Increasing the amount of calcium in villagers’ diets, or finding alternative sources of drinking water may be necessary in addition to these fluoride-reducing treatments.

Water samples from 48 of 50 wells tested in the Main Rift Valley contained fluoride levels six times higher than the World Health Organization safe guidelines of 0.5 to 1.5 mg/litre (milligrams per liter, equivalent to parts per million). The U.S. optimal level of fluoride in drinking water ranges from 0.7 to 1.2 mg/litre.

In some of the communities in the valley, the fluoride levels in their well water were so high that treating the water to cut the fluoride content by half didn’t drop the fluoride levels below the guidelines.

According to the report, most efforts to combat fluorosis in the Main Rift Valley have focused primarily on treating drinking water to reduce its fluoride content.

However, in villages where people had access to milk, the researchers found that severe fluorosis was about 10 percent less likely to occur. Further research is needed to explain this exception, but it may be possible that by injesting milk some of the population received enough calcium to hinder fluorosis development.

An increase in calcium may be key to addressing widespread oral health problems faced by the millions of rural residents in Ethiopia’s remote, poverty-stricken Main Rift Valley.

For more on this story see: Water Treatments Alone Not Enough to Combat Fluorosis in Ethiopia

Science Friday: Fluoride Being Added Back in City Water

Science Friday: Fluoride Being Added Back in City WaterThe City Council of Pinellas Park Florida has unanimously agreed that fluoride should be added back to the city water.

Dentists in the community supported adding fluoride in the public water supply, supporting the ADHA position that “fluoride is an effective, safe, and inexpensive way to prevent tooth decay.”

Dr. Dick Tomlin, a dentist in Pinellas Park for 42 years, said fluoride accounted for a “direct improvement” in his patients’ teeth.

TBNWeekly.com reports that dentist Tomlin was quoted as saying, “I have seen a lot of changes in over three generations of patients. There’s no question in our minds — we have seen a dramatic decrease in the decay in the kids we see. That’s all we’re after.”

TBN states that the fluoride mixture to be added to the water would be kept in bulk storage tanks outside the city’s two pump station. The city plans to maintain fluoride levels in the city water at 0.7 parts per million. Once new storage tanks and other equipment are installed, annual costs would work out to be approximately $1.40 per resident.

For more on this story see: Fluoride to go back in city water

What are your thoughts on the science behind fluoride in city drinking water?

Science Friday: Can Gum and Hard Candy Help Prevent Cavities?

Science Friday: Can Gum and Hard Candy Help Prevent CavitiesAs reported in Science Daily News, the American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs assembled a multi-disciplinary expert panel to provide recommendations on nonfluoride options that could provide an extra benefit to prevent cavities in dental patients at high risk for developing cavities.

In its report the panel revealed that sugar-free chewing gum, lozenges and hard candy including xylitol or polyol combinations, and a prescription varnish with chlorhexidine and thymol could be beneficial in preventing cavities when used in conjunction with a comprehensive cavity prevention program which includes the use of fluoride-containing products.

The scientific panel further recommended that dentists consider applying a mixture of cholrhexidine-thymol varnish to the teeth of high-risk adults and the elderly every three months to reduce cavities developing in the root of the tooth.

The panel also encouraged dentists to consider advising parents and caregivers of healthy children older than 5 years who are at higher risk for cavities to chew sugar-free polyol gum after meals for 10 to 20 minutes to prevent cavities.

The ADA report is available on their Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry website at ebd.ada.org. The executive summary of the report is published in the September issue of The Journal for the American Dental Association.

For more on this story see: Sugar-Free Polyol Gum, Lozenges, Hard Candy: Nonfluoride Varnishes Help Prevent Cavities, Study Finds

Science Friday: No Link Between Fluoride in Bone and Osteosarcoma

IADR and FluorideA study by the International and American Associations for Dental Research found no significant association between bone fluoride levels and an osteosarcoma risk.

There has been an ongoing heated debate as to whether there is an association between fluoride and a risk for osteosarcoma.

As reported by Medical News Today, the study sample included incident cases of primary osteosarcoma and a control group of patients with newly-diagnosed malignant bone tumors. Specimens of tumor-adjacent bone and iliac crest bone were analyzed for fluoride content.

“The controversy over whether there is an association between fluoride and risk for osteosarcoma has existed since an inconclusive animal study 20 years ago,” said IADR Vice-president Helen Whelton. “Numerous human descriptive and case-control studies have attempted to address the controversy, but this study of using actual bone fluoride concentrations as a direct indicator of fluoride exposure represents our best science to date and shows no association between fluoride in bone and osteosarcoma risk.”

For more on this story see: Bone Fluoride Levels Not Associated With Osteosarcoma

Disclaimer

© 2017, The Wealthy Dentist - Dental Marketing - All Rights Reserved - Dental Website Marketing Site Map

The Wealthy Dentist® - Contact by email - Privacy Policy

P.O. Box 1220, Tiburon, CA 94920

The material on this website is offered in conjunction with MasterPlan Alliance.

Copyright 2017 Du Molin & Du Molin, Inc. All rights reserved. If you would like to use material from this site, our reports, articles, training programs
or tutorials for use in any printed or electronic media, please ask permission first by email.