Dental Safety: BPA Exposure and Dental Sealants (video)

Dental Safety: BPA Exposure and Dental Sealants (video)This week Campbell’s Soup Company announced that they are phasing out bisphenol A (BPA) in their canned food linings.

BPA is a chemical that can imitate human estrogen and is thought by some health care providers to be harmful to health.  BPA is commonly used additive in food packaging and dental sealants.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also reported that they will make a decision by March 30th on whether to the ban the use of bisphenol A in food and beverage packaging.

Dental composites have revolutionized dentistry, especially cosmetic dentistry. But composite resins and dental sealants also contain BPA.

Warned one dentist, “It’s a dangerous chemical that we are placing in a sensitive area, free to leech out 24 hours a day.”

Another dentist said, “The cumulative release of BPA from composites appears to be minimal from the available research.”

Recently there’s been a lot of negative publicity about bisphenol A being linked to heart disease, obesity and diabetes. In light of these recent reports, The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey asking dentists if they have dental safety concerns over dental composites.

Click on Play to hear how the dentists responded to the survey —

What are your thoughts on the use of BPA in cosmetic dentistry?

How Dentists Deal With Dental Practice Burnout (video)

How Dentists Deal With Dental Burnout (video)It has been argued that dentistry can be a stressful occupation.

Possible root causes are demanding patient interactions, negative perceptions about dentistry, financial pressures from running a dental practice, challenging workloads, ever-changing new dental technologies, and lack of resources needed to create change.

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey to ask dentists if they have ever suffered from professional burnout.

A Massachusetts dentist responded, “Burnout to me is mainly the result of negative light in which most people view the dental office experience.”

4 out of 5 dentists in this survey answered that they have experienced professional burnout in their dental careers.

One dentist offered his solution to avoiding burnout, “Taking continuing education courses to learn and improve technologies rejuvenates my dental practice. It keeps me fresh.”

To hear more of what dentists had to say about professional burnout, Click Play to watch the following video:

Have you experienced burnout with your dental career?

For more information about burnout see: Dental Practice Burnout: 5 Symptoms and 5 Remedies

Internet Dental Marketing: Dental Website Link Building Strategies

Internet Dental Marketing: Dental Website Link Building StrategiesPart of a well-designed Internet dental marketing plan should include a link building strategy.

Over the past year Google has made even more changes to its search algorithm to offer up websites high in search that people have linked to and shared throughout the web. One of the ways Google decides how popular a website has become is to consider the type of links pointing to your dental website over your competition.

This is why it is important to create a dental marketing plan that includes a strong link building strategy to ensure that your dental practice website is ranking high in search.

But where do you start?

Here are 6 ways to improve your dental website link building:

1. Orthodontist, oral surgeons, prosthodontists and referral practices.
Do you refer business to other specialists? Consider asking for a reciprocal link in return for referring business. You could even recommend that they create a page dedicated to business they work with locally and recommend. Your dental practice could be listed under preferred dentists or dentists they recommend.

2. Friends and family.
Do you have family or friends who are active on the Internet? Do they have a blog or local website where they would be willing to link to your dental practice? Would you be willing to donate some money towards their hosting costs in return for a “Sponsored by” link?

3. Businesses you locally recommend.
Are there businesses in your community to which you regularly refer your dental patients? Have you thought about creating a referral webpage where you link to local businesses in exchange for a link back from their business website?

4. Social Media.
Make sure that you are creating regular dental SEO engagement on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Google Plus that includes a link back to your dental practice website.

5. Contests.
Think about creating a contest on your dental practice blog once a month that involves something dental patients would love to have. Ask them to share a link to your contest for even more chances to win.

6. Press releases.
Writing newsworthy press releases with links back to your dental practice website and making sure that they are distributed across newswires can not only raise the interest of reporters looking for stories or interview quotes, but they can also provide your dental practice website with high-quality links.

Some of these link building ideas will work better for your dental practice website than others. It depends on how you run your dental practice and the other dental specialists and local businesses that you engage with on a regular basis. But with just a little bit of effort you can receive links to your dental practice website and improve your search ranking over that of your local competition.

Yes, it does require some work, but doesn’t your dental practice deserve to thrive both online and off?

Dentists’ Views of the Presidential Election

Two Out of Three Dentists Prefer Republican Rule

In this survey, we asked dentists who they would like to see win the upcoming US presidential election. Two out of three dentists said they would rather see a Republican in the Oval Office than a Democrat.

Which Candidates Do Dentists Like?

Let me clarify that these poll numbers are not representative of the country at large. These numbers represent the opinions of dentists who chose to respond to our poll.

Among the 71% of dentists who identify as Republican, Mitt Romney proved to be the top choice. Here’s a breakdown of the Republican candidates:Presidential Election Dental Survey Results

  1. Mitt Romney (31%)
  2. Rudy Giuliani (21%)
  3. Mike Huckabee (17%)
  4. John McCain (11%)
  5. Ron Paul (11%)
  6. Fred Thompson (11%)

The 29% of dentists who prefer the Democrats have a clear favorite candidate: Hillary Clinton. Here’s how dentists feel about the Democratic candidates:

  1. Hillary Clinton (36%)
  2. Barack Obama (23%)
  3. John Edwards (21%)
  4. Bill Richardson (10%)
  5. Joe Biden (10%)

Check out the complete presidential election survey results…

FDA Finally Takes a Stand on Mercury… Sort Of

Agency Promises to Make a Decision Next Year

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has long avoided taking a public stand on the safety or danger of mercury in silver dental fillings. However, with a recent settlement in a lawsuit brought by the organization Moms Against Mercury, the governmental health agency has finally agreed to take a stand on the issue. Eventually.

The agreement calls for the FDA to complete its reclassification of dental amalgam by July of 2009. (The agency began that process in 2002.)

Some news articles have heralded this as a major change in the FDA’s attitude toward amalgam, with headlines making grand proclamations about a new post-amalgam era.

Can you guess which of the following is not a genuine headline?

These are attention-grabbing headlines, to be sure! The problem is, they’re not necessarily true per se. (And okay, I made the last one up.)

In the ADA’s response to news of the decision, the dental organization disputes these suggestions. “As far as the ADA is aware, the FDA has in no way changed its approach to, or position on, dental amalgam,” reads the statement.

As part of the agreement, the FDA has updated the consumer information provided by its website on the subject of mercury and dental amalgam.

“Dental amalgams contain mercury, which may have neurotoxic effects on the nervous systems of developing children and fetuses. When amalgam fillings are placed in teeth or removed from teeth, they release mercury vapor. Mercury vapor is also released during chewing. FDA’s rulemaking will examine evidence concerning whether release of mercury vapor can cause health problems, including neurological disorders, in children and fetuses.”
Questions and Answers on Dental Amalgam (FDA Consumer Information)

What do you think? Is this a new era, or just more of the same?

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