Dentists Say Specialists Usually Refer Patients Back

Prosthodontists and Periodontists Suck; Oral Surgeons and Orthodontists Rule

Dental Survey ResultsThis survey asked dentists how frequently their patients are referred back after being sent out for treatment by specialists. The clear majority said they always or almost always got their patients back.

Dentists reported that prosthodontists were the worst offenders when it comes to not referring patients back. There were also complaints about pediatric dentists and periodontists. Dentists were happiest with oral surgeons, orthodontists, and endodontists.

Here are some comments from dentists about specialist referrals…

  • “Periodontists only have incoming phone lines. They never refer back.” (Arizona dentist)
  • “Building a good relationship with your specialists is critical. Specialist referrals are our second greatest source of new patients, after existing patient referrals.” (Pennsylvania cosmetic dentist)
  • “Endodontists love to do it all, endo and restorations. They’re too greedy.” (Arizona dentist)
  • “The endodontists to whom I send patients are tremendous.” (Illinois dentist)
  • “Oral surgeons and orthodontists are a great source of new patients, especially in a growing area.” (North Carolina dentist)
  • “Orthodontists will not share or help with easy cases, and refer existing patients to oral surgeons, not back to us.” (Arizona dentist)
  • “I enjoy the relationship with my periodontist. He does the perio and I do the restorative. I’m not afraid that when I refer the patient that they will get lost.” (California dentist)
  • “Periodontists attempt to take over patients’ care and regular hygiene visits.” (North Carolina dentist)
  • “Pedodontists never, ever refer back! They are by far the worst of all specialists.” (Arkansas dentist)

about specialist referrals or read the complete results

Do You Have The Best Dental Sign? See Who Thinks Theirs is Better!

the wealthy dentist dental signage contest

In this article, we are featuring a few of the top contenders in our contest for the best dental practice office sign, display window or office front.

Do you think you have the best dental sign?

Does your dental office front kick butt?

Well, what are you waiting for?

Take a picture and enter The Wealthy Dentist Dental Practice Office Sign, Display Window or Front Picture Contest!

Hurry! We are still accepting submissions through June 30th.

Here are the most notable entries to date:

1. Jayhawk Dental

Window –

Signage –

Jayhawk Dental Sign

2.  Biderman Dentistry

Signage –

Biderman dental sign contest

3.  Boger Dental

Window dressing and signage –

Boger Dental Sign

4.  Marina – Pacific Dental

Window dressing,  signage and front office –

Marina Pacific Heights Dental

So come on!

Enter your dental office sign or office front for a chance to win a Cisco Flip. Just submit a photo of your dental sign or office front by emailing chughes(at)drs1.com before midnight on June 30th.


Dental Signage tutorialDesigning The $1,000,000 Dental Sign

Everything you need to know to design and position your sign – even tips on how to pick the best location for a new dental facility.

Dentists Frustrated by the Limitations Dental Boards Put on Dental Marketing (video)

dental boards and advertisingThe purpose of state dental boards is to make sure that dentists stay in line both professionally, clinically and ethically. They make sure dental marketing stays in line too.

The Wealthy Dentist asked dentists if they feel that state dental boards unfairly restrict dental practice marketing. Two out of three dentists said no – dental boards are just protecting the public’s best interest. But one out of three dentists was frustrated by the limitations dental boards put on advertising and other dental marketing efforts.

Watch the Video to hear more of what dentists have to say –

What are your thoughts on state dental boards and dental marketing?

The Sickening News about Tainted Dental Lab Work

Chinese Dental Labs Turn Lead into Gold…?

When a 73-year-old Ohio woman fell ill, the news made national headlines. It wasn’t old age, or pneumonia, or cancer, or anything else you might expect. She had gotten lead poisoning from her new dental bridge.

Though she’d visited an American dentist, the bridge itself had been fabricated by a Chinese lab. Let me assure you that this is major news. I expect this health scandal will rock the world of dentistry.

Lead: How Many Parts Per Million Is Okay?
210 Discovered in one Chinese-made crown
160 Discovered in Ohio woman’s dental bridge
600 US legal limit in paint, toys, etc.
90 International standard for items such as toys (now being considered by US Congress)
1 Amount the UK permits in dental work
0.5-3 FDA guidelines for leachable lead in ceramic dishware
0.1 FDA limit in candy and food
0.1 Amount naturally in a healthy person’s blood

The Ohio woman received this new dental bridge last year. However, the restoration site became inflamed, and chewing was unmanageably painful. The bridge was ultimately removed, and she’s had further surgeries since. She sent the bridge in question to a scientific testing laboratory, and its surface allegedly tested at 160 parts per million of lead. She has since retained a lawyer and is planning to sue her dentist. (Please note that she is planning to sue her dentist, not the dental lab!)

Chinese exports have received massive amounts of bad press after various health scandals. Do you remember the animals who died from eating tainted pet food? Then at least 21 Panamanians died after taking poison cough syrup. Danger made its way onto US shelves via toxic toothpaste. Most recently, children’s toys were pulled from the market after it was discovered that the paint contained high amounts of lead. All of these products were manufactured in China.

I know what many of you dentists are wondering: Is this for real? What evidence is there that Chinese labs are systematically producing lead-tainted dental restorations? Well, here’s the evidence that has so far come to light on this developing story:

  1. The Ohio woman’s partial bridge apparently tested at 160 parts per million of lead.
  2. Ohio TV station WBNS then conducted its own investigation, releasing the results on February 27. With the help of a local dentist, they ordered crowns from four different Chinese dental labs. One of the eight crowns tested positive for lead. The porcelain facing contained 210 parts per million.
  3. The ADA announced that it had begun its own investigation, and had recommended that the FDA and CDC do the same. (Read the ADA’s response and their talking points for dentists.)

Though most press focuses on work manufactured in China, it’s worth noting that products are imported from many other countries, including India and Mexico. Imported restorations are dramatically less expensive than work produced domestically; in some cases, a crown from China may cost as much as 90% less. Cost-saving measures have led to more and more international manufacturing.

In the US, about 15-20% of dental lab work is produced in China (primarily bridges and crowns); that’s 7 million foreign crowns each year. Many of these products are distributed by American labs. Three years ago, less that 1% of UK dental restorations were produced in China; that number is now up to 5%.

Theoretically, the FDA monitors all dental products, whether produced domestically or abroad. The FDA has the authority to inspect any dental lab, foreign or domestic, that makes products sold in the US. Dental labs with overseas operations must register with the FDA. But within the US, only three states (Texas, Kentucky and South Carolina) require dental labs to register with state health departments.

The National Association of Dental Labs (NADL) officially recommended that the FDA close some of these legal loopholes. Needless to say, the organization that represents 1400 US dental labs has grave concerns about the allegations of tainted dental products.

The lead appears to be in the porcelain surface of some restorations. But many foreign labs use porcelain and other materials made in the US or Europe. So where does the lead come from? Many suspect the lead is in the glaze used to stain and seal the porcelain.

Many pottery glazes contain lead. The lead itself is not particularly a problem until it comes into contact with acid. The acid is what allows the lead to leach out of the glaze. For pottery, this isn’t much of a problem. But since the human mouth is an acidic environment, lead might be transferred to the patient’s bloodstream.

Let’s be clear on this point: The FDA says there should not be detectable levels of lead in the surface material of a dental prosthetic device. Lead poisoning generally causes non-specific symptoms such as aches, abnormal bowels, or high blood pressure. As a result, proper diagnosis can take years.

Though labs are supposed to label outsourced work they provide to dentists, anecdotal evidence suggests that dentists do not in fact always know where their restorations were manufactured. Dentists: Do you know where your restorations are manufactured? Estimates suggest that 25% of US dentists are sending lab work to China – and what’s more, many of these dentists don’t even know it. You can’t just assume your dental lab does its own manufacturing. As a dentist, it’s your job to make sure you can stand behind the safety of any restorations you do.

Anyhow, folks, that’s just the tip of the iceberg! Check your inbox this Friday for a survey question on foreign dental labs. And you definitely won’t want to miss my next editorial. Do you know which of the major US dental labs import or manufacture foreign dental work? I do! And next week, I’ll start naming names.

Learn more – Plus, click here to post your comments on this story.

Dentist Claims She Contracted HIV at South African Dental Clinic

Many Patients are HIV Positive, But Few Tell Their Dentists

A dentist in South Africa claims she was infected with HIV by a patient during a dental procedure, and she’s asking the government to compensate her.

The government-employed dentist, a Russian-born woman in her 60s, says she was infected during a routine root extraction at the Soshanguve Clinic in 1996.

Though she suspected that the patient was HIV positive, she did not report her puncture wound at that time. She later tested positive for HIV in an insurance exam. Her husband tested negative, and she alleges that the patient is the source of her infection.

When she brought her case to the Compensation Commissioner (CC), her claim was denied. Though the CC did not dispute that she had been injured, they pointed to the lack of any direct evidence. “It will be improper to draw an inference that she was probably infected with HIV as a result of the 1996 incident, without medical evidence relating to his (the patient’s) HIV status,” declared the CC.

But she’s appealing that decision, saying that she was unfamiliar with the CC policy declaring that all incidents must be reported right away.

Read more

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