Root Canal Fees: General Dentist Vs Endodontist

root canal feesThis survey found the average root canal fee is $887 if treatment is performed by a general dentist and $1,500 if done by a specialist, with the majority of dentists surveyed saying they perform root canals.

Fees for different teeth vary only slightly regardless of whether performed by a generalist or a specialist.

At a general practice –

  • D3310 – anterior tooth: $745.00
  • D3320 – bicuspid tooth: $850.00
  • D3330 – molar: $1,013.00

At a specialist practice –

  • D3310 – anterior tooth: $1,300.00
  • D3320 – bicuspid tooth: $1,195.00
  • D3330 – molar: $1,268.00

Root canal therapy costs somewhat more from endodontists than from general dentists, especially on posterior teeth. Of course, an endodontist will perform a difficult root canal, while a general dentist might refer out that endodontic procedure.

Here are some dentist comments about root canals:

  • “I don’t do endo in my office any more. With microscopes and all the other technology available in endo offices, I feel my patients are getting a better quality service with the specialist than I can provide.” (General dentist)
  • “How about when the root canal needs to be extracted 4 months later and the patient demands a refund and/or free extraction?” (General dentist)
  • “Root canals performed by endodontists are a better alternative to tooth extraction.” (Tenessee endodontist)
  • “What used to take several long appointments can now be performed in one appointment, but some require more, so it’s better to refer to an endo.” (General dentist)
  • “I need to raise my fees.” (Texas dentist)
  • “About twenty years ago, the Federal Government prosecuted a small group of dentists who discussed their fees over coffee. The government considered this to be “price fixing” which is against the law. Since then, dentists have been publicly warned not to discuss their fees among themselves or face prosecution.” (California dentist)

Read more: Fees for a Root Canal Average $887 – $1,195 and Root Canals: Who Needs an Endodontist?

Dentists Prefer Facebook For Their Dental Marketing

Dentists Prefer Facebook For Their Dental MarketingFacebook has turned into a popular dental marketing tool for dentists to attract more dental patients.

9 out of 10 dentists use Facebook as their preferred place to network online.

While Facebook is facing criticism over their often-disputed privacy policies, most of the dentists using Facebook use it for both professional  and personal networking.

“We are at the beginning stages of our Facebook dental marketing. We are using it as an informational, personable and promotional platform. We are giving our patients useful information, keeping them updated on what is new in our office, and giving away prizes for liking our page. We also give patients $5 off their services when they check in! responded one dentist.

The Wealthy Dentist decided to survey dentists to ask what sort of social networking they do online, and whether it was for personal or business purposes.

Dentist use of social media

Dentists use the following social networking sites professionally –

  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • YouTube
  • Blog
  • Google Plus

And for personal use?

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Plus
  • LinkedIn and blogging were used the least

Here are some dentist comments:

“We have a business Facebook page which does well for us. I update it regularly and have a couple staff that like to write updates on the wall, too.” (Ohio prosthodontist)

“I haven’t yet figured out what to make of Twitter.” (General dentist)

“I still prefer word-of-mouth recommendations most of all.” (Arizona dentist)

“I really do not have the time or inclination to follow through with these media platforms.” (Massachusetts dentist)

With Facebook about to make a public of offering, which is estimated to bring in about 10 billion dollars, it is time for just about every dental practice that is serious about dental marketing to get on the Facebook bus!

Dentist Believes Dental Insurance is Detrimental to Dental Patients

Dentist Believes Dental Insurance is Detrimental to Dental PatientsRecent statistics have stated that roughly one out of every two Americans lacks dental insurance coverage.

It has been proven that having dental insurance makes dental patients visit their dentist more often for treatment.

According to a report by the Institute of Medicine, patients who do not have dental insurance are approximately two-thirds less likely to have visited their dentist within the past year, compared with those who have dental insurance coverage.

But do these statistic tell the whole story on dental insurance?

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey asking dentists what percentage of their dental patients still carry dental insurance.

One general dentist responded, “We will file for all our patients but are not in network with any insurance companies. I see about 50% of patients with insurance.”

The dentists reported the following percentages of patients with insurance —

  • 29% — 50 – 70% of patients have dental insurance
  • 26% — 70 – 90% of patients have dental insurance
  • 18% — Less than 50% of patients have dental insurance
  • 13% — 90 – 95% of patients have dental insurance
  • 08% — Don’t accept dental insurance
  • 06% — Answered “other”

How dentists feel about dental insurance is another matter and here’s what they told The Wealthy Dentist in their survey responses —

“I hate dental insurance!” (Alabama dentist)

“Taking dental insurance allowances is a recipe for financial failure. Just look at the numbers.” (Pennsylvania dentist)

“Dental insurance? Bah humbug!” (Virginia oral surgeon)

“Dental insurance is detrimental to dental patients and practices.” (Texas dentist)

“Many of our patients know most dental insurances stink as far as reimbursement amounts and yearly maximums, yet 70% of them still carry dental insurance. It’s a huge factor around here.” (Ohio prosthodontist)

“We don’t accept dental insurance as a form of payment, but we will fill out their forms so they can get paid. Some insurance companies will then send a payment to us and we have to reimburse the patient.” (Illinois dentist)

“Dental insurance: love it/hate it, but so it goes.” (General dentist)

“There is a definite reduction in companies who are willing to provide dental plans and a definite move by patients to either drop their coverage or to seek out a dentist in their network.” (Texas dentist)

“Dental insurance creates more problems than it solves.” (California” dentist)

“We are not a preferred provider for anyone, but accept any insurance that allows out of network dentists. We do charge the patient the difference between our fees and what the insurance pays.” (General dentist)

“Regardless of our profession’s exhortations regarding lifelong dental health, the fact is that many people would never visit a dentist if they didn’t have dental insurance. The idea of “free” services is their motivation. If they had to pay the full cost, they wouldn’t visit the dentist at all.” (California dentist)

The Wealthy Dentist agrees with the last statement by a California dentist. Patients who have some type of dental health plan are more likely to return regularly to your dental practice and accept treatment recommendations.

This results in your dental practice having more active cases and fewer inactive patients, thus increasing your practice bottom line over time, which makes you more profits in the long run.

Dentist Survey: How Many Hours Does an Average Dentist Work? (video)

dentist hours survey postThe Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey that asked dentists how much they work each week.

Of the dentists who responded to the survey, we found that dentists’ average work week is about 35 hours.

A dentists’ work week involves more than just treating patients, there are also dental practice management issues that have to be attended to.  Dental practice management involves smart decisions about how much time to spend providing dental care.

“When I cut back to four days a week fifteen years ago, my income went up, not down!” said a California dentist.

Click on play to watch the survey video and hear the survey results –

How many hours a week do you work and how much of that is spent treating patients?
106-Dentist_Work_Week.mp4

Dental Marketing: 69% of Dentists Do Not Target Dental Insurance Patients

69% of Dentists Do Not Target Dental Insurance PatientsA Center for Disease Control and Prevention report found a primary indicator of access to dental care in the United States is dental insurance. Previous studies have shown that persons with private dental insurance have more dental visits in the previous year than persons without private dental insurance.

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey asking dentists if they actively target new insurance patients as part of their dental marketing.

69% of the dentists who responded do not target new dental insurance patients, while 31% do target them.

Location was not a factor in this survey.

Here’s what the dentists had to say about targeting dental insurance patients

“How do you target new insurance patients?” (North Carolina dentist)

“We choose to remain fee-for-service even in this economy.” (New York dentist)

“We belong to few networks. We do advertise that we take and file most insurance coverage. It makes no difference in our treatment plans.” (Texas dentist)

“We did not participate in any dental insurance plans until very recently, but had too many patients calling to say that, although they didn’t want to leave the practice, they were forced to, as they couldn’t afford to pay the difference for “out of network” any longer. In Illinois, thanks in part to higher taxes on individuals and much higher taxes on businesses, the economy is as bad (or worse) than ever. Even the CHICAGO Mercantile Exchange is talking about leaving Illinois!” (Illinois dentist)

“Yes. If they are in a difficult contracted insurance benefit company and are a business owner or an executive who can make decisions on plans, we encourage them to look at other plans that are less expensive for the employer, better benefits for the patient and better reimbursement for the provider. If they are employees, we strongly encourage them to discuss changing to another plan that benefits the employee, the employer and the Dr. There are many benefits that work so much better. Why should an employer and employee contribute their monies to a insurance benefit that is primarily interested in taking money out of the middle rather than benefit the employer and the employees?” (Minnesota dentist)

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