Dentures: Do General Dentists Need Prosthodontists? (video)

Dentures: Do General Dentists Need Prosthodontists?As we all know, prosthodontists specialize in making dentures, but many general dentists offer in-house dentures too.

Some dentists feel that referring denture patients out to a prosthodontist is unnecessary.

One New York dentist said, “Having made thousands of dentures over the years, I’ve never referred a denture patient to a prosthodontist. I have, however, received denture referrals from prosthodontists!”

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey of dentists to see if they offer in-house denture services. 94% of the dentists surveyed reported that their dental practices offer in-house denture services for prosthodontic patients.

Click on Play to watch the video and hear what dentists are saying about dentures –

Does your dental practice refer out to prosthodontists?

Dental Care: The Truth About Who is Placing Dental Implants (video)

Dental Care: The Truth About Who is Placing Dental Implants (video)Prosthodontists, periodontists and oral surgeons love dental implants, and so do general dentists. Specialists claim they are more qualified to place dental implants, but a lot of general dentists place dental implants.

Said one general dentist, “I place implants myself, but only in ideal situations.”

Another general dentist said, “After referring to specialists and getting back poor work , I thought: How much worse can I do? Now I offer implants.”

This The Wealthy Dentist survey asked the question  that many dentists requested we ask: Do you place your own dental implants?

Click on Play to hear how dentists and specialists responded —

Ever since American Idol judge and Aerosmith lead singer, Steven Tyler received dental implants this year to restore his two front teeth by a dentist in Paraguay, there’s been a new surge of interest in implant technology.

What are your thoughts on who should be placing dental implants?

Dental Marketing: Dentists See a Difference in Online Dental Patients

Dental Marketing: Dentists See a Difference in Online Dental PatientsIn The Wealthy Dentist’s weekly survey, we recently asked: Are patients who find you online any different from patients who find you via more traditional methods?

The dentists we polled were pretty split on this dental marketing issue.

34% of those polled said, “No, I don’t see a difference.

While 23% of the dentist respondents felt that online dental patients are more likely to follow through with treatment; the other 24% felt online patients are less likely to follow through with treatment.

Another 19% felt that word-of-mouth referrals by patients are the best type of dental patients to follow through with treatment.

One dentist replied, “Word-of-mouth referrals brings in the most loyal patients!

Dental Marketing: Dentists See a Difference in Online Dental Patients

Dentist certainly have different opinions about online verses traditional patients! Here are some of the comments we received on this survey:

“Referral patients have more trust from the beginning. Online patients are typically younger and not as financially able to afford treatment.” (General dentist)

“The majority of our big cases the past few years have come from the Internet.” (Minnesota dentist)

“The younger dental patient is more tech savvy and tend to believe what they read on-line. They are less critical thinking and very wed to their smart phones. They are also not big conversationalists.” (California dentist)

“They were motivated to look for a dentist. However, they also are more likely to have been regular patients elsewhere and have little work to be completed; may be prophy only.” (Texas dentist)

“The stronger the site encouraging appointments the better the lead. Most dental websites are so easy to give information, but the prospect is not ready or willing to come in.” (New York dentist)

“For me, a cold online lead is not unlike a patient who drove by and saw my sign. They are a tougher sell than a true internal referral. A Facebook referral can be close to an internal referral when referred by an existing patient.” (Georgia dentist)

“Online patients have done their research and know a lot about our office before becoming patients. They are certainly more likely to follow through with recommended treatment.” (Ohio dentist)

“Online patients are generally young, looking for the best price and not dentally educated. Anyone who chooses a dentist based upon online reviews sees dentistry no different than a gas station or a supermarket.” (Massachusetts dentist)

The rising popularity of researching dental care online proves that for an increasing number of dental patients, factors like online reviews and easily finding a dentist online, seeing what dentist family and friends recommend online, and getting to know the dental practice before ever stepping foot through the front door may continue to outweigh the advantages that traditional offline dental marketing has offered in the past.

What are your thoughts on traditional verses online dental patients? Do you notice a difference?

Dental Credit Cards Not Having An Impact on Dental Practice Bottom Line

Thousands of dentists across the US offer their patients dental credit cards to cover dental work that needs to be done. Only one third of dentists report that dental credit cards have helped increase dental practice income.

Dental credit cards are popular, but some dentists believe the dental credit cards are too expensive for their patients, according to our recent survey.

37% of dental practices get more money from CareCredit and other cards, while 24% get less money from credit cards now than five years ago. Only 14% don’t use dental credit cards at all.

The slight majority (37%) think dental credit cards improve their bottom line, while 14% think the dental credit cards aren’t worth it.

Here are some dentist comments:

  • “They’re bad news. They set up your patients for financial failure. Many of my colleagues say,
    ‘Well, it’s THEIR problem, not mine, how they take care of their dental financing.’ I disagree — if we set our patients up for financial failure, we are complicit in their problems.”
    (California dentist)
  • “Too expensive!” (General dentist)
  • “CareCredit charges very high interest rates for longer term ‘loans.’ We learned the hard way that the 18 month
    ‘interest-free’ option is not affordable–for us.”
    (Michigan dentist)
  • “Patients are less willing to pay the high interest rate even with my paying 6 months of it.” (Texas dentist)
  • “Many people are reluctant to apply for MORE credit these days. I don’t blame them. Who wants another credit card? I heard that the average American has nearly $20,000 in credit card debt! Ouch.” (Ohio dentist)
  • “We love the outside financing companies because we no longer have to mail out as many statements and our collections rate has increased tremendously!” (Alabama dentist)
  • “Care Credit is the only dental credit program we offer.” (Illinois dentist)

Read more: Dental Credit Cards Not Having An Impact

Oral Health: Dentists Disagree on Which Toothpastes Are Best (video)

Which Toothpastes Are BestIt is estimated that Americans spend more than 1.6 billion dollars on toothpaste a year.

But, does it really matter which toothpaste you use?

A Pennsylvania dentist reports that he has patients who see great results by brushing with Ivory soap. Most dentists, however, felt using the right toothpaste makes a difference in your oral health.

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey asking dentists if it mattered which toothpaste dental patients use. Two out of three dentists say it matters!

Watch the following video to hear what dentists have to say about the best type of toothpaste for maintaining good oral health

What kind of toothpaste do you recommend?

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