Dental Survey: Lead is the Number One Dentist Concern (video)

Dental Survey: Lead is the Number One Dentist Concern Mercury and Fluoride, two chemicals that can be highly toxic, or highly helpful to dental health.

Lead and Bisphenol A, two more scary chemicals that might be in our dental work. It’s enough to make you wonder whether dentists might sometimes be doing more harm than good.

What’s worse, the scientific evidence isn’t clear.

Sighed one dentist, “I’d like to be doing all gold restorations.”

Another dentist commented, “I feel it’s ironic that some patients don’t want ‘artificial chemicals’ in their mouth and decline the natural elements in amalgam in favor of the complex chemistry of composites!”

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey of dentists asking how concerned they are about various potential public health threats linked to chemicals in dentistry.

Click on Play to hear what chemicals concern dentists the most —

What dental chemicals concern you?

Dental Survey: Fluoridated Water Debate Hits a Nerve

Dental survey: Water fluoridationThis dental survey by The Wealthy Dentist certainly hit a nerve!

We asked dentists what we thought was a simple yes or no question:

Do you support water fluoridation

The question turned out to be so volatile that it drew responses from non-dentists as wellas our doctor subscribers. Among them were nurses, nutritionists and biological researchers.

Looking at the overall results, 70% of respondents are against public water fluoridation.

However, we wanted to know what just the dentists in our survey think, so we isolated their responses.

As it turns out, the results were not that different: 56% of dentists think fluoride should not be added to public water supplies.

We also asked an open-ended question that got some heated responses:

Do you see fluoride as a wonder drug or a deadly chemical?

Here’s a sampling of comments that dentists gave us, from both sides of the water fluoridation debate:

Fluoride belongs in toothpaste, not water. That way, those who want it can have it. Besides, fluoride is only effective topically, not systemically.” Oregon dentist

Fluoride should not be added to the water supply as it’s effects on individuals cannot be monitored and the dose cannot be controlled. Treatments may be indicated in the dental office and people can choose to use fluoride toothpaste and rinses as well.” General Dentist

How can the toxicity be so ignored by main stream dentistry. It just seems like the more the merrier–no worries! ” California dentist

“I think the classification of it as a toxic waste is pretty self explanatory.” General dentist

“I use topical fluoride occasionally as prescription medicine for people with a disease. Topical ozone is more effective. I realize I’m leaving money on the table by not giving everyone topical fluoride treatments, but it’s not ethical. Water fluoridation is nothing but an industrial hoax. It doesn’t do anything but make a profit out of an environmental toxin.” Colorado dentist

“A drug it is not….a mineral that when ingested helps prevent decay, especially in children it is!!! [I’ve been a] pediatric dentist for 33 years and [have]hands on proof of positive fluoride assay.” New York pediatric dentist

“Having practiced in areas with and without fluoride in the water I find it difficult to even why anyone would even want to take fluoride out of the water. In non-fluoridated areas you see overwhelming levels of decay amongst the poor. In fluoridated areas, at least the decay is manageable.” General dentist

“If used properly and in the correct concentrations, it is very good.” Florida pediatric dentist

It’s a wonder drug when used in the correct concentration. My brother (who is not a dentist) and I grew up on fluoridated city water. We both now live in a cities with fluoridated water. He’s 44 years old and I’m 46 years old and neither of us have ever had a cavity. You can’t say its genetic (our parents had lots of cavities) and you can’t say its because we were always great brushers! I truly believe that it is mainly because we have always used fluoridated city water of the proper concentration.” Ohio prosthodontist

As a dentist, what’s your opinion of and experience with the effects of public water fluoridation?

Dental Marketing: Cosmetic Injectables, A Smart Economic Move for Dentists?

Dentists offering injectablesDepending on the dentist surveyed, the use of injectables in the dental office is either not a part of general dentistry, a smart economic move, or something dentists can do very well.

To dentists who support offering injectables as part of their dental marketing, they see it merely as a natural extension of the cosmetic treatments that they already provide. To dentists who dislike the idea, injectables are just an invitation to a malpractice lawsuit.

One thing is for sure: Injectables have become one of the most popular cosmetic medical procedures in the United States. According to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, the number of non-surgical cosmetic treatments, such as injectables, has jumped 228% since 1997.

Who will fill the demand?

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey asking dentists if they have started administering injectable treatments such as BOTOX® and Dermal fillers for cosmetic reasons. 85% of the dentists surveyed responded, “No!” for a variety of reasons.

Here is what they had to say –

Not a part of dentistry…

“These procedures should not be done by a dentist.” (Indiana dentist)

“They’re cheesy and unprofessional!” (California prosthodontist)

“They’re not dental procedures. I don’t care if some dentists want to do them. I know one who does them and he says women can get their husbands to pay these bills from the dentist, but would be more scrutinizing about bills from a plastic surgeon.” (Illinois dentist)

“It’s not part of dentistry.” (California dentist)

A smart economic move …

“I think I will get myself trained to be able to expand my cosmetic dentistry packages.” (General dentist)

“Patients pay up front for a quick procedure with no insurance paperwork. What’s not to like?” (Florida dentist)

“A great way to see patients several times a year since these patients need regular touch-ups. It can be added to a treatment package with routine dental cleanings.” (Arizona dentist)

Something dentists can do very well…

“Of course! This is something we as dentists could do very well. However, in California the oral surgeons seem to have cornered the market, so to speak…keeping the generalists out.” (California dentist)

Dentists give more injections than any other healthcare professional, so why not?” (Nebraska dentist)

“Who’s more qualified than a dentist that is already injecting patients needing fillings, or more extensive work every single day?” (West Virginia dentist)

Just an invitation to a malpractice lawsuit …

“I don’t believe extra oral injectables are within the scope of my dental license. I believe it verges on malpractice.” (Nevada dentist)

“The liability is too high; I’d rather leave it to MD’s with higher coverage.” (Texas dentist)

“I’m not sure about the complications with state and the malpractice issues with injectables.” (California orthodontist)

What are your thoughts on dentists offering injectables?

To participate in future The Wealthy Dentist surveys, please sign up for our newsletter in the right sidebar.

Dental Survey: Fees for Dental Implant and Crown

Fees for dental implant and crown

This dental survey from The Wealthy Dentist is short and simple. We asked doctors about their fees for dental implants — specifically what they typically charge for an implant and crown.

What is your typical fee for one dental implant and associated crown?

Fees for a single tooth implant ranged from a low of $1430 without an abutment, to $2765 including an abutment.

Fees for a single dental crown ranged from a low of $1000 to $2620.

As one respondent pointed out, dental implant costs comprise many more components than just an implant and crown.

In reality, there is no “typical” dental implant case, so the actual costs to patients depend on individual case requirements.

Fees vary based on which tooth is being replaced, and can include bone grafts, CT scans and other services.

What are the fees for dental implants in your practice?

Root Canals are the Most Profitable Procedure in Dentistry (video)

root canalsWhen a Virginia dentist was asked about the cost of root canals, he responded by saying, Root canals are the most predictable and profitable procedure in dentistry.  Dentists who do not do endo lose on the average $90,000!”

Do you believe this to be true?

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey that asked dentists about their root canal therapy fees.  Not all dentists agree that performing root canal treatments is worth the money.

“I have never been happier since I was told by a dental consultant: what would you rather do on a Saturday morning, play golf or do a root canal?” said a California dentist.

To hear more of what dentists had to say about root canal fees, please click play and watch the following dental survey video

Would you like to take part in our surveys?  Be sure to sign up for our email newsletters to the right.  Our survey question newsletter comes out every Friday.

What are your thoughts on root canal treatment?

For more on the cost of root canals see: Cost of a Molar Root Canal? $1,000

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