Sedation Dentists: What is the Cost of Sedation Dentistry? (video)

cost of sedation dentistryThe Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey that asked dentists about the cost of sedation dentistry.

The cost of sedation dentistry varies widely among dentists. Of course, if you are a dental patient spending thousands for cosmetic dentistry, then sedation fees are just a drop in the bucket.

The average fee for oral conscious sedation is about $300. Some dentists don’t charge, whereas others ask as much as $650.

A third offer IV sedation, charging about $500. But intravenous sedation fees ranged from $250-$800. Only 6% have general anesthesia capabilities. Ranging from $320 to $1200, anesthesia costs around $700.

“My IV sedation fee is based on the amount of time needed to complete dental procedures,” said a Florida pediatric dentist.

“Most of the time I don’t charge for the sedation as these are usually very large (20K plus) cases,” reported a Texas dentist.

To hear more of what dentists had to say about sedation dentistry, please click play and watch the following survey video –

Conscious sedation dentistry helps lower patients’ anxiety and marketing sedation dentistry to the anxious dental patient is a smart way to bring in new dental patients.

What do you charge for oral conscious sedation at your dental practice?

For more on this survey see: Sedation Dentistry: Cost of Peace of Mind

Dentists Worry About Long Term Use of NTI Splint (video)

NTI splint surveyThe NTI-splint is a dental mouthguard used to treat headaches, migraines and teeth grinding. But there are dentists who worry about its long-term use.

“I think the NTI-splint does more damage than good. It is only for immediate pain relief, not as a long-term appliance,” said a California prosthodontist.

“NTI causes open bite issues and long-term damage to the TMJ’s,” reported a Texas dentist.

Some dentists worry that improper use of the NTI can cause orthodontic problems or jaw pain.

“The NTI caused a patient increased TMJ pain,” said a Georgia dentist. “The NTI creates anterior open bites if used for the long term,” declared a Hawaii dentist.

To hear more of what dentists had to say about NTI-splints, please click play and watch the following survey video –

In general, it’s great for dentists have more treatment options in their bag of tricks, but the NTI is like almost any other treatment modality: if you don’t know what you’re doing, you can do more harm than good.

What has been your experience with the NTI-splint at your dental practice?

BPA & Dental Composite Safety (Survey Video)

Dental safety and BPAControversies about chemical safety are hardly new to dentistry. So it’s not surprising to find that dentistsare split down the middle in their opinions about the use of dental composite and sealants that contain bisphenol-A, or BPA as it’s commonly known.

In this survey, 46% said they had concerns about safety, while 54% are not particularly worried.

Jim Du Molin and Julie Frey discuss dentists’ thoughts on BPA safety:

“I’ve never had a patient even mention it, unlike the wackos who won’t let fluoride touch their kids’ lips,” offered a Michigan Dentist.

“I have some worries about safety,” said one General Dentist. “To temper this, you’ve got to remember that ANYTHING in the body outside of what is indigenous is considered foreign and has potential to elicit yet another of those unexpected side effects, sort of like most of Congress’ laws. Since I stopped doing sealants years and years ago, I am less concerned about the effect on most adults.”

“Are any of my patients worried about BPA? They should be!” exclaimed an Orthodontist. “My kids will never have sealants. Sealants are BS. Another way the insurance companies dictate how a dentist can make money: by compromising morals, yet again.”

It’s worthwhile to bring up safety concerns about Bisphenol-A in dental sealants and fillings. Unfortunately, the science isn’t particularly clear.

We still don’t have definitive scientific evidence that everyone agrees on when it comes to mercury, or even fluoride. So don’t expect the BPA controversy to be resolved anytime soon.

Read more about the dental survey here.

Want your opinions heard in future surveys?

To be included, just sign up for our weekly dental marketing and management newsletter at TheWealthyDentist.com.

Dentists: Do You Offer Laughing Gas? (video)

laughing gas survey videoNitrous oxide sedation at the dentist office is no longer the mainstay it once was, but laughing gas is still around. The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey asking dentists if they still offer laughing gas.

We received a variety of responses from dentists.

A Texas dentist replied, “Nitrous should be available in all offices. This is just good customer service. It is not the dentist’s decision whether or not a patient needs it. All patients should be asked if they would like it. Charge a reasonable fee and it is money in the bank!”

A Washington dentist disagreed, “I think it’s nuts to use nitrous…the dentist and staff are breathing it (which has been shown to cause miscarriages and neurological problems, along with who wants a “high” dentist), it’s takes tons of time to set up, and it’s expensive!”

We found that specialists are significantly more likely than general dentists to offer conscious sedation. Since specialists often perform more intensive procedures than general dentists, they may have need for more sedation dentistry options.

To hear more of what dentists had to say about nitrous oxide, please click play and watch the following dental survey video

Do you still offer nitrous oxide? Tell us what you think in the comments.

Would you like to take part in our dental marketing surveys? Be sure to sign up for our email newsletter in the right sidebar of this blog.

Our survey question newsletter is emailed each Friday.

Infection Control: Dentists Make Changes To Avoid Deadly Viruses (video)

infectious disease controlThis week an article by Science Daily outlined a study published in IOP Publishing’s Journal of Breath Research, where researchers invented a non-invasive breath test to measure the H1N1 strain (swine flu).

The researchers claim that over half of the people in Glasgow vaccinated during the 2009 swine flu pandemic were already infected with the flu virus, meaning they were vaccinated unnecessarily.

Scientists hope that a breath test will allow doctors to identify those who already sick, therefore allowing them to save the vaccine for people who are not yet infected.

This latest scientific invention reminded us of a Wealthy Dentist survey where we asked dentists if the threat of deadly viruses caused them to make any changes at their dental practice.

Click on Play to hear what dentists had to say about precautions against pandemics such as the Swine Flu –

The changes the some of the dentists surveyed made were –

  1. More frequent hand washing and use of a hand sanitizer.
  2. Not treating patients who feel ill.
  3. Encouraging sick employees to stay home.
  4. Use of R95 face masks.
  5. Use of eye shields.

This fall students entering 7th – 12th grade must get a whooping cough vaccine within the first month of the school year in order to stay in school.

Have you made any changes at your dental practice to avoid infectious diseases like the swine flu or whooping cough?

For more on the swine flu breath test see ‘Swine Flu’ Breath Test Could Reduce Future Vaccination Shortages, Research Suggests.

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