Dental School Drama Ends with $1.7M Payout

Most dentists will remember academic politics from their days in dental school, but few have seen the amount of drama Alissa Zwick has.

Zwick, 30, was asked to leave the University of Michigan’s dental school after her third year, allegedly because her clinical techniques were poor. (She maintained a B average.)

However, a federal jury sided with Zwick, finding the school’s action illegal and awarding the former student $1.7 million.

So what’s the real story? Well, it’s complicated…

Since Zwick has attention deficit disorder (ADD), she asked if she could take her exams in a private setting. Two of her professors objected to this. Associate Dean Dr. Marilyn Lantz apparently had pre-existing problems with these professors, who eventually resigned.

When this caused controversy among the students, Dr. Lantz put the blame on Zwick. Zwick’s public comments earned her first Lantz’s disapproval, then a surprising expulsion.

While the university will likely cover the damages, Dr. Lantz was named as the primary defendant. Zwick’s payout includes a million dollars in punitive damages.

Though she was admitted to seven other dental schools before Michigan, her expulsion has left her unable to get into any other dental program. So Zwick is now studying to be a speech pathologist.

Read more

Ireland Mulls $87k Dental Graduation Tax

Graduation taxIreland is facing a shortage of funds for higher education. A new plan proposes that, rather than raising tuition fees, graduates should have to pay a “graduate tax” to repay some of the costs of their education.

Dental students would face a €64,000 tax upon graduation.

Proponents of the plan insist that other graduates would have to pay far less, with the average student facing a €12,000 graduation tax.

As if dental school wasn’t expensive enough… How would you feel about paying an $87,000 tax to graduate?

Read more about the plan

Share your thoughts on the graduate tax…

Dentists Disappointed by Dental Graduates

Dental school graduates disappoint dentistsWhen it comes to dental school graduates, only one dentist in two is satisfied. Overall, dentists graded recent dental graduates at about a C+.

Half of survey respondents report that they are “satisfied” (33%) or “very satisfied” (17%). On the other hand, half are “seriously disappointed” (22%) or “mostly unimpressed” (28%).

Here’s what dentists have to say about dental school graduates – both in terms of dental practice management savvy and clinical know-how:

  • “I feel that a lot of the graduates of dental school do not have the work ethic that my group has, and they expect to be making a six figure income straight out of school!!” (Alabama dentist)
  • “Clinical requirements for graduation have been decreasing significantly, and students now are not getting the same education and experience students did 10 years ago.  Most receive little to no dental implant education and little experience with dentures.” (Ohio prosthodontist)
  • “Too many don’t know how to do the procedures required once in practice.  With us old guys being their backup, they continue to work… but as we retire, the skills we teach them are lost to them.”
  • “Texas has three fine dental school with state of the art equipment.” (Texas dentist)
  • “I think it is a shame that some state schools accept an inordinate number of international students over qualified in-state students, frankly because they can charge the former increased tuitions.”

Read more: Dental School Graduates Disappoint Dentists

Dental School Admissions: Male vs Female Applicants (video)

Many dentists would approve of gender profiling at dental schools – that is, of favoring male dental student applicants under the theory that will, statistically, more work total hours over the course of their careers. But the slight majority oppose giving preference based on gender.

“Live with it, people,” declared a male orthodontist. “Discrimination in any form is un-American.”

“I’m a little surprised that this topic has come into the open view, but it is undeniable,” offered another dentist. “The profession is losing manpower hours at a time when there’s a call to serve more people.”

Read more – Gender and Dental School Admissions: Dentist Survey Results

Dentists Open to Gender Profiling in Dental School Admissions

Many Say It Might Be Acceptable to Favor Male Applicants

Dental Survey Results

Drum roll please! I recently asked you if certain factors might make it legitimate for dental schools to favor male applicants – and fully 42% of you said yes! Some see it as discrimination, whereas others think it would help preserve access to care.

You can also check out Jim Du Molin’s editorial examining some of the facts about gender and dentistry.

Female Dentists Support Female Dental StudentsMale versus Female Dental Practitioners

Ah, gender…

Just as you might expect, men and women were split on this question.

It’s not terribly surprising that a dentist’s gender played a significant role in a his or her opinion on this subject.

The majority of male dentists (55%) feel it would be acceptable to profile applicants based on gender.

Only one in nine female dentists (12%) agrees.

The City Mouse Disagrees with the Country MouseUrban, suburban and rural dentists

Geographic location also played a major role.

While suburban dentists were split down the middle, urban dentists showed a preference for gender-blind admissions, and rural dentists in this survey approve of screening applicants for gender.

Dentists have no shortage of opinions on this highly charged topic…

For more insight, check out these comments!

  • “Dentistry should be embarrassed by this continued pattern of stupidity.” (Male New Mexico dentist)
  • “Since when do statistics about future work patterns determine admissions to any higher educational institutions in this country? Should unemployed college graduates not have been accepted at all because they are not working members of our society?” (Female South Carolina dentist)
  • “Women who want to be dentists should not be penalized.” (Female New York pediatric dentist)
  • “What a bunch of crap. It is surely more about the money for the dental schools; as in, how much they will get back in donations.” (Male Oregon dentist)
  • “If female dentists want to be home with their children and not practice at least 30 hours/week for at least four years, they should have to pay back to the state the amount it cost to train them.” (Female Alabama dentist)
  • “I am so tired of seeing female dentists who don’t want to work. Stop taking a spot in dental school. You have an obligation to the profession. If you only want to work part-time, be a hygienist!” (Female Ohio dental office worker)
  • “A dental shortage does exist in the US, and males who can afford to work more hours per week are a significant solution to that problem.” (Male Florida dentist)
  • “As a female dentist, I still have to deal with gender bias when it comes to associate job interviews. I am still asked to this day if I am married and do I have kids at an interview! It’s bad enough that we still have to deal with this from the ‘good old boys club.’ We don’t need it in our schools too.” (Female Florida dentist)

Read the complete
gender and dental school
survey results…

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