Dentists Say Electric Toothbrush No Better Than Manual Toothbrush

No Better Than Manual Toothbrush

Is the electric toothbrush all hype?

The NZ Herald surveyed a group of independent dentists and found that many dentists are uncomfortable with their profession’s relationship with some dental products and their marketing companies.

One product endorsement that seemed to bother the dentists the most is in the area of electronic toothbrushes.

According to the Herald, dentists were split 50-50 about whether an electric toothbrush gave a better clean. The dentists who support manual toothbrushes felt that brushing is about how well someone brushes — not the toothpaste or toothbrush used.

In other words, any type of toothbrush is only as good as the person who is using it.  Overall, many dentists felt there wasn’t a bigger advantage to using one type of toothbrush over another.

So why endorse the more expensive electric toothbrush?

Some dentists feel product endorsements arise from the close relationships between dental associations and dental product manufacturers.  In the Herald survey, several dentists broke ranks with the professional associations – one of which receives sponsorship from Oral-B – to speak out and say that the clean provided by an electric toothbrush is no better than a manual toothbrush.

Both the New Zealand Dental Association and the New Zealand Dental Therapists Association declined to comment on the survey.

What do you say?  What type of toothbrush do you advise your patients to use?

For more on this story read: Electric brush: tooth or fiction

Confrontation Is Not the Way to Deal with a Thieving Employee

What to Do When You’ve Discovered an Embezzlement

Editorial
by Jim Du Molin

Now, finally, what to do when you think you are being embezzled by an employee? For reasons I do not want to discuss in a public forum, it is important that you DO NOT IMMEDIATELY CONFRONT THE SUSPECT with your concerns or evidence.

Step back, take a deep breath, and call your accountant. Discuss your concerns. Set up a meeting to review what you have found. If your accountant believes there is enough smoke to proceed, do an audit. But do it privately, after hours. Do not let the suspect or ANY other employees know that you have a concern.

Your main goal is not to be accused by the suspect of defamation! This is a common tactic of embezzlers. Once you have proof of the problem, you have two choices. Your path will depend on the size of the embezzlement. In either case retain an attorney to review your options.

If the amount is under $10,000, terminate the employee without getting into ANY discussion of your proof or suspicions. If you are in an “At Will” state, you don’t have to even give a reason. Just say that you “don’t feel the two of you are on the same page” and you are letting him or her go. Again, consult your attorney.

I know that this advice will frustrate many of you reading this. Yes, you may end up paying unemployment costs, but in the long run, it is worth it. The reality is that this is the least expensive, least stressful and least time-consuming approach to the problem. I have been through this many times with many doctors who wanted to crucify the suspect and run him out of town on a rail all the way to the penitentiary. The reality of that happening is nil, and your chances of getting any money back are less than 10%.

I know it’s hard advice to hear… but it is the most valuable tip I can give you.

Tooth Whitening Wars in North Carolina: Is Your State Next?

The FTC and Teeth Whitening Wars in North CarolinaIn North Carolina, tooth-whitening services can be administered by non-dentists in hair salons, retail stores, and at kiosks in shopping malls.

And the FTC in North Carolina believes a dentist doesn’t need to be present.

In 2010 the North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners attempted to reign in the non-dentists by sending out 42 letters notifying tooth-whitening providers that they were illegally practicing dentistry and ordered them to stop.

As reported by DrBicuspid.com, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) then initiated an action against the North Carolina dental board, alleging that the board violated federal law in their attempts to block non-dentists from providing tooth-whitening services.

In February 2011, the dental board retaliated by filing a lawsuit against the FTC, accusing the commission of violating the U.S. Constitution in its attempts to keep the North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners from regulating tooth-whitening services being offered by non-dentists.

A FTC judge fired back by denying the dental board’s motion to dismiss the FTC’s complaint and unanimously rejected the argument that the state action doctrine exempts it from antitrust scrutiny under the Federal Trade Commission Act.

The FTC judge further ruled that the North Carolina State Dental board’s efforts to block non-dentists from dispensing whitening services constitutes an illegal anti-competitive conspiracy.

In an email to DrBicuspid.com, Board attorney Noel Allen writes, “If a clear state statute, a century of court precedents, and the United States Constitution no longer allow the state of North Carolina, acting through its General Assembly, to define the practice of dentistry to protect our citizens from the illegal and unsafe practice of dentistry, then it should be the Congress or the U.S. Supreme Court that pronounces the death of that state right. The decision should not come from the FTC acting on its own initiative, without even so much as internal rule to support it.”

The North Carolina State Dental Board argues that they never tried to stifle competition and were only trying to protect the public from non-licensed dental treatments.

The battle between dentists and teeth-whitening providers is being fought in other states as well. Recently the Connecticut State Dental Commission ruled that tooth whitening is dentistry and can no longer be performed without a dentist present, while another judge ruled against the New Jersey Dental Association in their legal battle against a chain of tanning salons offering tooth-whitening services.

What are your thoughts? Do you think tooth-whitening services require a dental license?

For the entire story by DrBicuspid.com see: FTC Judge Rules That NC Dental Board Acted Illegally

Dental Practice Marketing: Which Campaigns Work Best?

Dentists Share Their Most Effective Marketing Strategies

The Wealthy Dentist asked dentists about which dental marketing campaigns have been most successful for their dental practices. The clear winner was direct mail marketing. Dentists have also had good luck with Yellow Pages listings and TV ads. One dentist was thrilled with his new dental practice signage, saying, “60 new patients per month with the new sign!”Most effective dental marketing campaigns

Here are the top types of marketing campaigns for dental practices:

  1. Direct Mail
  2. Yellow Pages Listing
    TV Advertisement
  3. Internet Directory Listing
    Signage
    Newspaper
  4. Website Promotion
    Billboard
    New Patient Discount
    Radio

“We sent out a personal holiday card with a short letter of thanks and future exciting information to present and past patients we hoped to reactivate,” wrote one dentist. “It did not go to the few difficult patients. We had a huge response of reactivation and new referrals from present happy patients!”

Read the complete dental marketing campaign survey results…

Dentists: Are Dental Hygienists Worth Their Weight in Gold?(video)

Dentists: Are Dental Hygienists Worth Their Weight in Gold?(video)In our story, Dental Hygienists Among the Fastest Growing Occupations in the U.S. we revealed that the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook for 2008-2018 expects the demand to hire more hygienists to perform preventive dental care will continue to grow.

According to the ADA, independent dentists reported paying full-time dental hygienists $33.90 per hour in 2008.

Considering the current economic environment The Wealthy Dentist decided to conduct a survey asking dentists if they pay their hygienists an hourly wage or if compensation is based on commission.

It seems most dentists still pay their dental hygienists an hourly wage, but some feel paying on commission is more fair. Said one dentist, “Hygienists are worth their weight in gold!” Another dentist disagreed saying, “Practices couldn’t run without them, but the current economics barely breaks even at best … hygienists seem to think they are cash cows for the office and fail to recognize the support and facilities the utilize.”

It’s an interesting economic issue. Click on Play to hear more of what dentists say about paying hygienists —

How do you pay the hygienist in your practice?

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