Infection Control: Dentists Make Changes To Avoid Deadly Viruses (video)

infectious disease controlThis week an article by Science Daily outlined a study published in IOP Publishing’s Journal of Breath Research, where researchers invented a non-invasive breath test to measure the H1N1 strain (swine flu).

The researchers claim that over half of the people in Glasgow vaccinated during the 2009 swine flu pandemic were already infected with the flu virus, meaning they were vaccinated unnecessarily.

Scientists hope that a breath test will allow doctors to identify those who already sick, therefore allowing them to save the vaccine for people who are not yet infected.

This latest scientific invention reminded us of a Wealthy Dentist survey where we asked dentists if the threat of deadly viruses caused them to make any changes at their dental practice.

Click on Play to hear what dentists had to say about precautions against pandemics such as the Swine Flu –

The changes the some of the dentists surveyed made were –

  1. More frequent hand washing and use of a hand sanitizer.
  2. Not treating patients who feel ill.
  3. Encouraging sick employees to stay home.
  4. Use of R95 face masks.
  5. Use of eye shields.

This fall students entering 7th – 12th grade must get a whooping cough vaccine within the first month of the school year in order to stay in school.

Have you made any changes at your dental practice to avoid infectious diseases like the swine flu or whooping cough?

For more on the swine flu breath test see ‘Swine Flu’ Breath Test Could Reduce Future Vaccination Shortages, Research Suggests.

Dental Practice Technology: 66% of Dentists Use Digital X-rays

digital xraysDigital technology has reached the dentist’s office. According to Yale School of Medicine, 10 to 30% of dentists have abandoned film for digital X-rays.

When we asked dentists if they use use digital x-rays, 66% said yes. Only 34% reported that they still use film.

“Digital x-rays have improved dentistry so much. I can’t imagine going back to the old way of developing x-rays. It has allowed doctors to diagnose a patient when they are away from the office,” said one periodontist.

“Couldn’t live without digital,” offered another.

A great investment –

“Possibly the best investment I have made in my practice.” (Kentucky dentist)

“One of my best purchases. I’ve been digital over 4 years.” (Florida dentist)

“We implemented digital about a decade ago and would never go back.” (South Carolina dentist)

“One of the most cost-effective things I’ve done. I have been digital since 2000.” (California dentist)

“Yes, who in this day and age doesn’t? It is SO inexpensive compared to what I paid over 10 years ago to do it, that it is a “no-brainer” to do. PLUS the savings in chemicals, processor maintenance, employee time to do these non-essential weekly maintenance jobs, making duplicates for Insurance etc. just makes going digital a “slam dunk” decision! This is why, once I purchased it, I realized these benefits and then lectured on going digital.” (Illinois dentist)

“It’s wonderful! Less radiation the patient and staff is exposed to and the ability to manipulate the images.” (Florida hygienist)

“Higher diagnosable image versus film, no fixer, developer, film, mounts cost, lower patient and ambient radiation levels — truly a no-brainer!” (North Dakota dentist)

Too expensive for some –

“Very expensive to fully implement.” (Missouri dentist)

“Digital has improved greatly, but I am not interested in the investment at this late stage of practice.” (Indiana dentist)

“I would love to have a digital pan/ceph, but at $44K, I’ll have to pass for now.” (Oklahoma dentist)

“Too expensive!” (Nevada dentist)

“I am 67 years old in a month or so and it is hard to spend that much money.” (California dentist)

“Way too costly!” (Massachusetts dentist)

Sensors can be an issue –

“Sensors are too @#*&! expensive!” (Mississippi dentist)

“The technology finally meets or exceeds the quality of film radiology — but with some drawbacks. The cost for the sensors and viewing equipment is very high, compared to the same film-based radiology. The bitewing views are not fully closed-mouth as bitewings done with films, because of the sensor cords. And the sensors have some limitations of placement freedom due to their rigidity and thickness compared to the relative patient comfort with films.” (California dentist)

“Since no sensor has been declared superior, I believe buyers need to evaluate the software. How many ‘clicks’ needed to go through the fmx, to modify contrast/brightness for diagnosing and making notes? You should be able to do this quickly ‘on the fly’ as the patient hears you review their x-rays. The right-click menu and simple keyboard shortcuts should be available so you don’t have to mouse all over the place for everything. I also believe software using the “template” paradigm of x-ray sets is a throwback to the past and is not good use of computer power.” (Illinois dentist)

“They have to make the sensors either less expensive or more durable.” (California dentist)

Dentists: Would a Former Associate Steal Your Dental Patients? (video)

Dentists: Would a Former Associate Steal Your Dental Patients? (video)Dentists, do you think an ex-employee or associate would steal your dental patient lists?

In a survey conducted by the research firm Ponemon Institute, 59% of ex-employees admitted to stealing company data when leaving their prior employment.

Dental patients are a dentist’s most valuable resource, but competition can be so tough that some dentists have seen exiting dental employees steal their patient lists.

One dentist complained, “Every GP associate I’ve had has tried to steal patients. It’s like inviting someone into your home, then finding your silverware is missing after they leave.”

Another dentist said, “I’ve had employees try; the patients usually complain to me personally about the situation. Loyalty is rewarded.”

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey asking dentists if they have ever had problems with ‘patient stealing‘ by associate dentists or employees leaving their dental practice.

To hear how dentists responded, Click on Play —

What has been your experience with dental pateint stealing at your dental practice?

Dentists Don’t Sell Their Practices, They Sell Their Leases…

dental lease advocate Lewis GelmonThe Hidden Costs of Bad Dental Practice Leases
Special Lease Feature by Lewis Gelmon

Dentists are shocked when I tell them that you don’t really sell your practice; you sell your lease. This simple but disturbing reality has become evident to me from the thousands of leases I have reviewed for dentists since 1994.

Dentists spend decades building good will and providing excellent dental care. They spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on marketing, state-of-the-art equipment, and creating a comforting environment for patients and staff. Unfortunately, all the money, time and effort spent does not necessarily translate into a high sale price.

How can a dentist avoid that unfortunate fate? With a proper office lease agreement that has been carefully crafted for a dentist planning to sell his or her practice.

Over the years, I have been invited to speak at dental conferences (like the Greater New York Dental Meeting, the Pacific Dental Conference and countless local dental societies and association meetings) on this subject. However, my mission is still far from complete.

It seems that more and more dentists are finding themselves caught in a classic landlord trap. I receive one or more phone calls each week from dentists across the country who are in the process of selling their practice but have run into problems with their landlords. These calls all tend to sound the same.

The dentist sounds stressed on the phone. He explains that he has tentatively sold his practice. When he approached the landlord to assign the lease to the new owner, the landlord asked for a letter formally requesting the transfer of the lease to the new dentist. A few days after sending the letter, the landlord called. After reviewing the lease agreement, the landlord has determined that he now has the right to terminate the lease and remove the original dentist from the premises.

The landlord goes on to explain the dentist’s choices. He can give the space back and vacate the premises as promised in accordance with the lease. Alternatively, he can pay the landlord a fee for agreeing to waive the right to exercise their option to terminate, allowing the dentist to remain on the premises and sell the practice. Depending on location and the value of the sale, this fee is usually somewhere between $75,000 and $250,000.

Take a moment to process that: It can cost a dentist up to a quarter of a million dollars to transfer their lease. I’ll bet you didn’t know that, huh?

Property owners often understand the business of dentistry better than dentists themselves. In fact, many landlords pride themselves on such business practices as a way to share in the sale proceeds of their most valuable professional tenants. Buried deep in the lease agreement is an “Assignment Provision” that governs the details of how to transfer the lease (change of control) when selling the practice. These provisions are often extensive and hard to understand. Most allow the landlord overwhelming control over who you can sell, as well as the opportunity to prevent the sale or terminate the lease. In my opinion, the purpose of these onerous sections is simply to provide property owners with the opportunity to share in the sale proceeds of your practice when you sell.

But do you really want your landlord to make a hefty profit from the sale of your dental practice?

The solution is simple. I like the over-used but very true axiom, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” If you ever plan to sell your practice, you need to make sure you can first sell your lease. This requires knowing where the risks are before putting your practice up for sale. Given that there are other potential problems, the best thing you can do is to have your lease properly reviewed to ensure it’s structured correctly for sale and follows good leasing guidelines for dental offices.

Looking for more information on the topic? You can reach Lewis Gelmon at (760) 479-9704 or lewis@lewisgelmon.com. For only $495, he will personally review your lease. Plus, get a $200 discount until October 31 just for mentioning The Wealthy Dentist. All reviews are guaranteed. If you don’t feel you have received the value, he’ll give you a full refund, no questions asked.

Lewis Gelmon is a former landlord, lease negotiator, and shopping center manager. Now a dental tenant advocate, he regularly lectures for dental groups across North America and the UK. He is the most published author on the subject of dental lease negotiations. His Good Leasing Guidelines for Dentists have been critically acclaimed by numerous dental groups. His mission is to raise awareness among dentists on the risks hidden in their office leases.

Dentist Boasts Patients Travel 4 Hours for His Dental Treatments (video)

dental patient travel distanceAn implantologist boasts that many of his dental patients travel up to four hours by car for their dental treatments at his practice. However, as surprising as it might seem, it is not unusual for dental patients to travel hundreds of miles to see their favorite dentist.

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey that asked dentists how far some of their dental patients travel for an appointment at their practice.

Dentists responded that many of their patients travel five to ten miles, but others continue to see them after moving hundreds, or even thousands of miles away.

Click on Play to hear what dentists had to say about patients who travel for their dental appointments –

Not surprisingly, rural patients travel farther to see a dentist than do urban residents.

“Some patients will travel 30+ miles,” wrote a rural dentist, “and then there is the fellow who comes twice a year from the Netherlands…”

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