Menopausal Patients Linked to Increased Risk for Gum Disease

menopause and gum diseeaseCase Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine and the Cleveland Clinic say that menopausal women may need to see the dentist as many as four times a year to control dental plaque.

Leena Palomo, an assistant professor of periodontics, and Maria Clarinda Beunocamino-Francisco from the Center for Specialized Women’s Health at the clinic completed a comparison study of women on and off bone-strengthening bisphosphonate therapies for osteoporosis.

In the women they studied, they found a marked increase in dental plaque levels, which could endanger the jawbones of postmenopausal women. (Dental plaque is a biofilm that develops naturally on our teeth. If the plaque is left on teeth too long, it triggers gum disease.)

“Menopausal women at risk for osteoporosis also are at risk for periodontal disease, which affects bone that anchors teeth,” says Palomo. “To keep jawbones strong and healthy,” she added, “means getting rid of the dental plaque by seeing the dentist as many as four times a year for deep periodontal cleanings.”

Do you find that your menopausal patients have more problems with dental plaque than their younger counterparts? What do you recommend to your female patients over 50?

For more on this subject, visit Science Daily.

Dentists Say Electric Toothbrush No Better Than Manual Toothbrush

No Better Than Manual Toothbrush

Is the electric toothbrush all hype?

The NZ Herald surveyed a group of independent dentists and found that many dentists are uncomfortable with their profession’s relationship with some dental products and their marketing companies.

One product endorsement that seemed to bother the dentists the most is in the area of electronic toothbrushes.

According to the Herald, dentists were split 50-50 about whether an electric toothbrush gave a better clean. The dentists who support manual toothbrushes felt that brushing is about how well someone brushes — not the toothpaste or toothbrush used.

In other words, any type of toothbrush is only as good as the person who is using it.  Overall, many dentists felt there wasn’t a bigger advantage to using one type of toothbrush over another.

So why endorse the more expensive electric toothbrush?

Some dentists feel product endorsements arise from the close relationships between dental associations and dental product manufacturers.  In the Herald survey, several dentists broke ranks with the professional associations – one of which receives sponsorship from Oral-B – to speak out and say that the clean provided by an electric toothbrush is no better than a manual toothbrush.

Both the New Zealand Dental Association and the New Zealand Dental Therapists Association declined to comment on the survey.

What do you say?  What type of toothbrush do you advise your patients to use?

For more on this story read: Electric brush: tooth or fiction

Silver Amalgam Use Now the Focus of a United Nations Treaty

Silver Amalgam Use Now the Focus of a United Nations TreatyFoxNews.com is reporting that a United Nations global mercury treaty on mercury pollution may become reality and America’s dentists could be subjected to an international ban on filling cavities with “silver amalgam” containing mercury.

The next round of “mercury talks” is scheduled for Monday in Kenya and State Department officials reportedly said they hope to garner support for a legally-binding treaty to reduce worldwide mercury emissions.

Dr. David Simone, a dental surgeon from Northbrook, Ill., who attended the State Department meeting, told FoxNews.com that State Department officials reiterated that amalgam fillings will likely remain on the U.N.’s designated list of products to eventually be phased down with passage of the so-called global mercury treaty.

There is a controversial ongoing argument among dental health professionals about the possible health risks associated with mercury exposure from amalgam fillings, and competing sides disagree on whether the amount of mercury in fillings causes risks.

The ADA supports the position that dental amalgam is safe and posts the following statement on its website –

Dental amalgam is considered a safe, affordable and durable material that has been used to restore the teeth of more than 100 million Americans. It contains a mixture of metals such as silver, copper and tin, in addition to mercury, which binds these components into a hard, stable and safe substance. Dental amalgam has been studied and reviewed extensively, and has established a record of safety and effectiveness.

The FDI World Dental Federation and the World Health Organization concluded in a 1997 consensus statement: “No controlled studies have been published demonstrating systemic adverse effects from amalgam restorations.” Another conclusion of the report stated that, aside from rare instances of local side effects of allergic reactions, “the small amount of mercury released from amalgam restorations, especially during placement and removal, has not been shown to cause any … adverse health effects.”

In 1998 the ADA’s Council on Scientific Affairs published its first major review of the scientific literature on dental amalgam which concluded that “based on available scientific information, amalgam continues to be a safe and effective restorative material.” The Council’s report also stated, “There currently appears to be no justification for discontinuing the use of dental amalgam.”

In an article published in the February 1999 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association, researchers report finding “no significant association of Alzheimer’s Disease with the number, surface area or history of having dental amalgam restorations” and “no statistically significant differences in brain mercury levels between subjects with Alzheimer’s Disease and control subjects.”

A 2003 paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine states, “Patients who have questions about the potential relation between mercury and degenerative diseases can be assured that the available evidence shows no connection.” [Read more …]

Robert Ferguson, founder and president of the Science and Public Policy Institute (SPPI), told Foxnews.com that he sees the controversy surrounding dental amalgam as little more than the latest scare to drive more regulation.

What are your thoughts on the use of silver amalgam in dental treatments?

For more on this story see U.S. Weighs Support for U.N. Treaty That Could Force Dentists to Change Materials Used in Fillings.

Watch for more on this subject in the November issue of Academy of General Dentistry in a feature article by Eric K. Curtis, DDS, MA, MAGD titled, Black and White with Shades of Gray Ruminations on Amalgams in a World of Composites.

Dentistry Gone Wild! Can a Dentist Talk to Zoo Animals at Night?

Dentistry Gone Wild! Can a Dentist Talk to Zoo Animals at Night?Does scaling a fence at the zoo relieve stress for dentists?

Maybe one dentist thought so before getting into hot water over a nighttime wall-climbing stunt.

Louisiana dentist Dr. Matt Sanderson is being investigated by the Monroe Police Department for entering the Louisiana Purchase Zoo by scaling the fence after hours.

The dentist told the Star News that he picked up his 14-year-old daughter and six of her friends from the movie theater  after seeing the movie “Man on a Ledge” and decided to take them on an adventure.

“One of the girls said something about seeing a movie about a zoo, so I said, ‘Well, let’s go to the zoo.’ We got there about 8 p.m. The fence was not very tall so we climbed it and went inside and took some pictures,” Sanderson said.

Upon leaving the zoo, the dentist was approached and questioned by the police, but not arrested.

Monroe Police Chief Quentin Holmes confirmed that Dr. Sanderson has not been charged with trespassing, but said the investigation is expected to conclude next week.

Dentist Sanderson spoke with zoo officials the next day and apologized. He also ended up apologizing to the girls’ parents. He claims only one mother was upset because she believed he took her daughter into an unsafe area.

Once the story hit the news Sanderson confessed to The Star that, “Right now, sitting here in the light of day, it wasn’t the smartest thing I’ve ever done. I’ve done a lot of fun adventures, but I agree it went too far.”

He’s one lucky dentist, many of us here in California remember what happened to the youths who entered the San Francisco Zoo at night and were mauled by a tiger.

I actually think this doctor handled the potential blow-back on this escapade fairly well. Just about everyone has done something that ” in the light of day, it wasn’t the smartest thing I’ve ever done.”  That doesn’t make right but by apologizing publicly and profusely he has mitigated the incident as best as possible under the circumstances.

Next time he might want to take the girls to an indoor rock-climbing facility instead.

For more: Dentist Says Climbing Zoo’s Fence After Hours Was Mistake

Sedation Dentistry Gone Wild: Dentist Pulls All Ex’s Teeth

Sedation Dentistry Gone Wild: Dentist Pulls All Ex's TeethBreaking up is hard to do, especially when you’re a dentist from Poland.

A freshly dumped dentist is facing jail time after surgically removing all of her ex-boyfriend’s teeth.

Apparently, dental patient Marek Olszewski stopped by ex-girlfriend Anna Machowiak’s dental practice with a bad toothache just days after breaking up with her for another woman.

Dentist Machowiak agreed to treat Olszewski and that’s when things went haywire for the former couple.

Once the ex was sedated, the dentist suddenly had second thoughts. “I tried to be professional and detach myself from my emotions,” Anna Machowiak told the U.K.’s Daily Mail. “But when I saw him lying there, I just thought, ‘What a b——d.’”

That’s when she decided to pull out all of his teeth.

Talk about sedation dentistry gone wild!

When Marek Olszewski awoke from his sleep dentistry, dentist Machowiak informed him that there was “complications” and that his face was wrapped to prevent him from opening his mouth.

According to the Daily Mail, Machowiak told her ex-boyfriend that his mouth was numbed and that he wouldn’t be able to feel anything for a while and that the bandage was there to protect the gums, but that he would need to see a specialist.

Once he arrived home and went to examine what was done, he found that all of his teeth had been pulled.

Dentist Mackowiak is under investigation for medical malpractice and abusing the trust of a dental patient. She could face up to three years in prison. I’m sure they could use an experience sedation dentist in prison.

And what is it they say about karma?

Olszewski’s new girlfriend dumped him because he no longer has any teeth.

Under the UK’s dental health plan the poor guy could be looking at years of waiting for dental implants . . . but I’m sure he could start with a nice set of dentures.

Disclaimer

© 2017, The Wealthy Dentist - Dental Marketing - All Rights Reserved - Dental Website Marketing Site Map

The Wealthy Dentist® - Contact by email - Privacy Policy

P.O. Box 1220, Tiburon, CA 94920

The material on this website is offered in conjunction with MasterPlan Alliance.

Copyright 2017 Du Molin & Du Molin, Inc. All rights reserved. If you would like to use material from this site, our reports, articles, training programs
or tutorials for use in any printed or electronic media, please ask permission first by email.