Dental Marketing: The Real Facts About Dentists Using Facebook Pages

With more than 500 million active users now on Facebook, The Wealthy Dentist decided to conduct a survey asking dentists if they have a Facebook page for their dental practice to support their dental marketing efforts.

Facebook is now used by 1 in every 13 people on earth and is beating Google in terms of traffic.

60% of dentist who responded to this survey have a Facebook page for their practice, while 40% do not.

Suburban dentists use Facebook pages more than urban dentists, with rural dentists not using Facebook pages at all.

Of the 60% of dentists who are using Facebook pages, the average number of “likes” for a page is 158. The highest number of page “likes” reported are 821 and the lowest is 5.

Here are some dentist comments on Facebook pages —

“Facebook provides easy interaction with patients who are active users.” (Minnesota dentist)

“We have had giveaways every other month like a gas card, free teeth whitening, and an iPad on Facebook.” (General Dentist)

“Just starting to use it. Giving away a Kindle for Christmas for one lucky new Facebook Fan.” (West Virginia dentist)

“Electronic email seems to be more effective. They don’t have to like you to get postings, even though the can unsubscribe.” (California dentist)

“I am not sure exactly what Facebook’s value in marketing does for a practice.” (California orthodontist)

“I have a Facebook page because people feel dentists should be involved in latest social media…” (Illinois dentist)

“I am not sure I want one.” (New Jersey dentist)

“Yes, I think if it’s done correctly, it will be another way to market my practice.” (California dentist)

“I haven’t seen much benefit, despite the 1-2 time a week postings.” (Nevada dentist)

“I don’t have a clue about how to set it up.” (General dentist)

“We use it for referrals, trivia, giveaways, etc.” (Utah orthodontist)

“I don’t have time to maintain it and it’s not helpful if you don’t spend some time on it.” (Texas dentist)

As a dentist, if you want to increase your dental marketing influence, a Facebook Page is an additional option; it’s not something that’s going away anytime soon, and we anticipate that it’s something that will continue to grow.

We will continue to keep you updated on how a Facebook Page can assist your dental marketing efforts.

Do you have a Facebook Page?  What are your thoughts?

Dental Marketing: Facebook as an Effective Internet Marketing Tool

Dental Marketing: Facebook as an Effective Internet Marketing ToolEffective dental marketing requires that dentists keep up a regular presence with dental patients in order to ensure success.

Having a dental website, blog, newsletter, Google+ page and Facebook page are all important factors in keeping your dental practice in front of your dental patients.

Some dentists are still not convinced that Facebook is an effective Internet dental marketing tool.

Last week, Facebook started the process for its highly-publicized IPO. In anticipation, the online competitive intelligence service Hitwise just released their 10 Key Statistics about Facebook, comparing the Facebook audience with that of other social networks.

Here is what Hitwise found —

1. Facebook captures 1 in every 11 Internet visits in the United States.
2. 1 in every 5 page views occurs on Facebook.
3. The average visit time on Facebook is 20 minutes.
4. Facebook’s audience skews slightly more female than the online population as a whole.(Female is 57%, male is 43%).
5. The ages of Facebook visitors are indicative of the website’s strength in the marketplace, with relative parity in distribution of its visit share by age vs. the online population (Ages 18-24 is 18%, 25-34 is 23%, 34-44 is 21%, 45-54 is 19%, and 55+ is 20%).
6. Facebook wins 499,949,430 visits from the most affluent income group versus YouTube’s 223,732,591 visits and Twitter’s 15,166,795 visits.
7. Facebook became the #1 ranked website in the US on March 9, 2010.
8. “Facebook” is the most searched term in the US and Facebook-related terms account for 14% of the top search clicks.
9. Facebook users are highly loyal to the website; 96% of visitors to Facebook were returning visitors in January 2012.
10. Internationally, Facebook ranks in the top 2 websites in every market except China, where Sina Weibo, Baidu Zhidao and Renren are the dominant social networks.

Hitwise further states that “Facebook is the largest website in the US and a top performer in numerous international markets. The fan base of the site is loyal and spends a significant portion of their time online on the social network. Facebook’s influence is seen in the presidential elections, digital shopping habits and beyond.”

Last June Hitwise concluded in their Facebook Fan Acquisition and Analysis that 1 Facebook fan is equal to 20 additional visits to a business website over the course of a year. If you have 500 Facebook fans, this means an extra 10,000 visits to your dental website a year.

Hitwise wrote, “The figure of 1 fan = 20 extra visits to a website uses a unique methodology that combines Hitwise data with data from social media experts Techlightenment. We took the top 100 retailers ranked in the Hitwise Shopping and Classifieds category and bench-marked visits to those websites against the number of fans those brands had on their Facebook page. We then also looked at the propensity for people to search for those retail brands after a visit to Facebook using our Search Sequence tool.”

Here at The Wealthy Dentist we firmly believe that your dental marketing plan should include a Facebook page. With dental patients spending more time online, dentists should increasingly be looking to use Facebook as a part of their dental marketing.

Facebook fans can play a role in dental patient retention and procurement by helping to drive dental website traffic, boosting dental practice awareness, demonstrating dental treatments or acting as a customer testimonial billboard.

Dentist Feels Sedation Dentistry Helps Many Patients

Dentist Feels Sedation Dentistry Helps Many PatientsThree out of four dentists surveyed offer sedation dentistry.

“Sedation dentistry helps so many people. Most stop using it after three visits or so due to a significant lessening of their anxiety,” responded one prosthodontist to the latest The Wealthy Dentist survey that asked dentists if they offer dental sedation.

“Sedation is not the be-all, end-all,” advised one dentist.

The respondents to this survey reflected the following charges for sedation services —

The lowest cost of conscious sedation dentistry was $70, and the highest charge was $680. The cost of IV sedation ranged from $225 up to $1,200.

Percent of dentists who perform sedation dentistry

Here are some comments from dentists who responded to this survey —

“It is great combination with CEREC users. One appointment dentistry while sedated.” (General dentist)

“There is a strong pain-in-the-butt factor associated with this service. Don’t get sucked into it.” (Massachusetts dentist)

“I’ve been sedating for 30 years.” (California dentist)

“I am a dentist anesthesiologist. I charge an hourly fee. I am perfectly fine with my client doctors doing oral sedation with proper training. I think it is important that they have someone like me to check with if they have a question or concern.” (Washington dentist anesthesiologist)

“Having well-trained providers of dental sedation is a key to our success as a profession. As long as there are dentists who believe in papoosing, there will be those who have fears. Funny, an ENT would never papoose a child for ear tubes. Why do we think it’s acceptable for dental treatment?” (Pediatric dentist)

If you are a doctor who offers sedation dentistry to your patients, it’s important to market this fact to potential patients. It can help bring new patients into your dental practice.

Dental Practice Technology: 66% of Dentists Use Digital X-rays

digital xraysDigital technology has reached the dentist’s office. According to Yale School of Medicine, 10 to 30% of dentists have abandoned film for digital X-rays.

When we asked dentists if they use use digital x-rays, 66% said yes. Only 34% reported that they still use film.

“Digital x-rays have improved dentistry so much. I can’t imagine going back to the old way of developing x-rays. It has allowed doctors to diagnose a patient when they are away from the office,” said one periodontist.

“Couldn’t live without digital,” offered another.

A great investment –

“Possibly the best investment I have made in my practice.” (Kentucky dentist)

“One of my best purchases. I’ve been digital over 4 years.” (Florida dentist)

“We implemented digital about a decade ago and would never go back.” (South Carolina dentist)

“One of the most cost-effective things I’ve done. I have been digital since 2000.” (California dentist)

“Yes, who in this day and age doesn’t? It is SO inexpensive compared to what I paid over 10 years ago to do it, that it is a “no-brainer” to do. PLUS the savings in chemicals, processor maintenance, employee time to do these non-essential weekly maintenance jobs, making duplicates for Insurance etc. just makes going digital a “slam dunk” decision! This is why, once I purchased it, I realized these benefits and then lectured on going digital.” (Illinois dentist)

“It’s wonderful! Less radiation the patient and staff is exposed to and the ability to manipulate the images.” (Florida hygienist)

“Higher diagnosable image versus film, no fixer, developer, film, mounts cost, lower patient and ambient radiation levels — truly a no-brainer!” (North Dakota dentist)

Too expensive for some –

“Very expensive to fully implement.” (Missouri dentist)

“Digital has improved greatly, but I am not interested in the investment at this late stage of practice.” (Indiana dentist)

“I would love to have a digital pan/ceph, but at $44K, I’ll have to pass for now.” (Oklahoma dentist)

“Too expensive!” (Nevada dentist)

“I am 67 years old in a month or so and it is hard to spend that much money.” (California dentist)

“Way too costly!” (Massachusetts dentist)

Sensors can be an issue –

“Sensors are too @#*&! expensive!” (Mississippi dentist)

“The technology finally meets or exceeds the quality of film radiology — but with some drawbacks. The cost for the sensors and viewing equipment is very high, compared to the same film-based radiology. The bitewing views are not fully closed-mouth as bitewings done with films, because of the sensor cords. And the sensors have some limitations of placement freedom due to their rigidity and thickness compared to the relative patient comfort with films.” (California dentist)

“Since no sensor has been declared superior, I believe buyers need to evaluate the software. How many ‘clicks’ needed to go through the fmx, to modify contrast/brightness for diagnosing and making notes? You should be able to do this quickly ‘on the fly’ as the patient hears you review their x-rays. The right-click menu and simple keyboard shortcuts should be available so you don’t have to mouse all over the place for everything. I also believe software using the “template” paradigm of x-ray sets is a throwback to the past and is not good use of computer power.” (Illinois dentist)

“They have to make the sensors either less expensive or more durable.” (California dentist)

How to Become Recognized as THE Cosmetic Dentist Part 4

How to Become Recognized as THE Cosmetic Dentist in Your Community Part 4Last week, I shared with you the third step of How to Become Recognized as THE Cosmetic Dentist in Your Community Part 3: Scrap the Tabloids, Share Some Smiles.

So now that you’ve completed your self-evaluation of the practice and cleaned up the clutter of magazines in the reception room and replaced them with a practice promoting photo album and know the value of power educating with collateral materials…

You might be wondering, “What’s next?”

Step 3: EFFECTIVE USE OF A SMILE ANALYSIS FORM

How do you utilize the information gained in your Smile Analysis Form? Do you even have a form or is it a single question on your health history form – asking patients if they want to change anything about their smile? If you do use a form, was it designed to create the comfort level that patients need to confide what enhancements they are looking to have?

Once the form is filled out what does your receptionist do to help create awareness among your other team members that this patient might have some issues they need to address? While the patient is waiting in the reception area what does the receptionist do after reviewing the form regarding addressing the possible services that might solve their esthetic concerns?

Your receptionist will never diagnose, however they should be actively involved in the process. Remember the Power Triad Rx: To inform, educate and remove hidden objections that result in a motivated patient.

THE 80% RULE

Your receptionist is one of the KEY team members who can make or break your cosmetic program. Whether welcoming patients to the practice, answering questions on the phone — or in the office –- your practice and your patients will benefit when your receptionist and other team members have updated their cosmetic skill set.

Sounds easy enough but it does require dedication and effort. The good news is that this new skill set will be seamless with your existing systems when your receptionist works with the Silverman Institute’s 80% Rule.

The concept is simple…80% of the time, while you are in an operatory treating a patient, another team member should be informing, educating and motivating other patients about various cosmetic services.

Dr Silverman teaching the receptionist the 80% Rule at Boot Camp

Dr Silverman teaching the receptionist the 80% Rule at Boot Camp. “The key is not just having your patient fill out a form, but using the 80 Percent Rule in conjunction with the information obtained in the form.”

For example, while you’re completing the final touches on a Non-Invasive Veneer case, a patient is in the reception area talking to your receptionist. In addition to exchanging pleasantries, your receptionist reviews your next patient’s Smile Enhancement Form.

Noticing that the patient would like to enhance some of her teeth your receptionist takes advantage of this time to use the Power Triad Rx described above.

The reception area is where interest is generated while the patient is waiting to be seen by the doctor or the hygienist.

Don’t waste this opportunity to inform, power educate and motivate these patients. The truly cosmetically focused team will want to know how to maximize this key player.

COMPLIMENTARY REVIEW AND FORMS

My suggestion: Consider your Smile Analysis Form as a tool to gather information.

Don’t let it collect dust while the patient is waiting to be seen. Highlight the form with a yellow marker indicating what changes your patient was hoping to have made.

Would you like a complimentary copy of the Silverman Institute’s Boot Camp Smile Enhancement Form?

Simply send me a request to incrediblesmiles@aol.com with a brief explanation of why you hope this form will be helpful to you – and I will be happy to forward a copy of our form to you that you can test and see how it works with your patient population. (If you can include a copy of your office logo letterhead with the email then we can customize the form for your office).

And don’t forget to send me up to 3 photos of your reception area in .jpeg format if you would like me to offer some complimentary advice on how you might be able to enhance your cosmetic dentistry message.

In the next edition of How To Become Recognized As THE Cosmetic Dentist In Your Community:

Step 4: MOTIVATING OFFICE DECOR

About the author:

Dr  Harvey Silverman Dr. Harvey Silverman has successfully coached dentists on how to take their cosmetic dentistry practice to the next level since 1984. If you want information on how the Silverman Institute’s Cosmetic Dentistry Boot Camp Program can take your cosmetic practice to the next level, contact Dr Silverman at (216) 256-4599 or e-mail him at incrediblesmiles@aol.com.

Dr Silverman is the author of Best Cosmetic Dentistry Practices in Dental Products Report as well as Silverman On Smiles in Dentistry Today and is the inventor of the LifeLike Veneer System™ and the EasySmile Tooth Whitening System™ that will be available to dentists in 2012.

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