16 Percent of Dentists Do Not Have A Dental Website

dental websitesWhen dentists consider building a dental website they tend to think in terms of one massive site instead of several websites covering their areas of expertise. Having a multiple website marketing strategy can help you dominate search in your geographic area.

In our most recent survey, we asked dentists if their dental practice has multiple websites.

More than half (58%) said they have only one website. 15% replied that they have at least two dental websites, while another 11% have at least three. Urban and suburban dentists were more likely to have more than one dental website.

Shockingly, 16% of the survey respondents did not have a dental website at all.

Here are a few of the things our dentists had to say on the subject —

“We have dental website that we can change the content ourselves without paying the webhost and we have an optimized site that draws much more traffic.” (California dentist)

“We have 2 dental websites – 1 through your company [Internet Dental Alliance] which we are very pleased with and another through another company which I am very disappointed with and have switched companies 2 times and still am not getting what I want.” (Georgia dentist)

“We have multiple web addresses linked to one website.” (New York dentist)

“We just stated with second dental website — thought it would help.” (Pennsylvania dentist)

“We have only one website, but we have a Facebook Page also.” (Washington dentist)

Dental market domination should always the goal of your dental website. Instead of the traditional, one website approach, here at The Wealthy Dentist we believe in having several specialty-specific dental websites that support certain search phrases in addition to the dental website you may already own.

Having multiple dental websites helps you casts a wider reach across the top search results for your services as well as your dental practice itself. Multiple dental websites simply hedges your search position for a large set of dental keyword phrases creating a market monopoly strategy for a dental practice.

Multiple dental website marketing has all the features of search engine optimization and Internet dental marketing, but is easier to manage, more cost effective in the long run, and in many cases dramatically better at building targeted dental patient traffic.

What is your dental website marketing strategy?

Who Else Thinks Dental Marketing Is Dirty? (video)

Who Else Thinks Dental Marketing Is Dirty?Dental marketing programs can bring lots of new patients to a doctors office.

However, some dentists can’t help but feel dirty about themselves and their practices.

As one dentist pointed out, “A restaurant can’t say, ‘We won’t do marketing because we just want to cook good food for people.”

Sighed a prosthodontist,“Marketing is a necessary evil.”

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey that asked dentists if dental marketing was part of their job as a dentist.

There was no shortage of grumbles about what a pain dental marketing can be.

Click on Play to hear these thoughts (and more) from dentists —

What are your thoughts on dental marketing?

Can Popular Social Media Site Pinterest be Used for Dental Marketing?

Can Popular Social Media Site Pinterest be Used for Dental Marketing?We can hear dentists groaning now, “Please, not another social media site to integrate with my dental marketing plan!”

But only having a dental website isn’t enough anymore, especially if that dental website isn’t geo-targeted and isn’t up-to-date with the latest dental keyword phrases.

A modern dental practice must maintain an active, keyword rich website, a dental practice Facebook page, and a Google Plus page, and it also helps to post some dental demonstration videos on YouTube.

Social media is a great way for dentists to engage and communicate with dental patients on a regular basis. It takes a little more work on the dental practice side to keep the social media engagement going.

It’s not just a one-time post with a teeth-whitening special.

Social media is a conversation between the dentist and his dental patients about what’s going on at the dental practice, what new cosmetic dental procedure patients like, what new treatment financing options are available and so on.

And using the new social media site Pinterest can further help dentists promote their dental practice.

If you aren’t sure about Pinterest for dental marketing, then check out the following stats compiled by Monetate Marketing Infographics about Pinterest —

Is Pinterest the Next Social Commerce Game Changer?

Think about Pinterest as more of an online scrapbook that links to the websites where the images are found.  This is the traffic power behind using Pinterest.  Pinterest users “scrapbook” their ideas, hobbies, passions and inspiration with the world when they “pin” images to their virtual boards.

Members are able to follow each other and comment, just like other social media platforms.  They also share their boards with each other.

Here are 7 ways a dental practice can use Pinterest for dental marketing

1.  Share images of your dental practice, both inside and out.

2.  Share your before and after photos from those dental patients who have given permission to share their images online.

3.  Encourage your dental patients to share their images on your boards.  Ideas like “My dental patients graduating this year” and invite them to post their graduation photos with their beautiful smiles.

4.  Share new dental equipment.

5.  Even share the things you enjoy and you may find many patients who share your passions for trout fishing, race cars, or golf.

6.  If you have dental patients who are getting married, ask them to share a couple of their wedding photographs.

7.  Women are even planning their weddings on Pinterest.  Think of the services you can offer a prospective bride that she may want to include on her wedding planning boards for things she wants to get done before the big day.

Dentists must be present in more places online, and recognize that dental patients increasingly want to engage in social media, regardless of the platform. Broadening your dental marketing to include image boards on Pinterest is a simple new way to showcase your dental practice in a positive light.

(If you would like to receive an invitation to join Pinterest, please let us know in the comments and we will send you an invitation from The Wealthy Dentist. To see The Wealthy Dentist on Pinterest, go to pinterest.com/wealthydentist)

Dental Marketing: Lawsuit Looks at Slander in Negative Online Reviews

Dental Marketing: Lawsuit Looks at Slander in Negative Online ReviewsDentists, just when you thought there was no hope for combating negative online reviews, Virginia contractor, Christopher Dietz is suing a former customer, Jane Perez for a negative online reviews she wrote on Yelp and Angie’s list.

What makes this case encouraging is that the judge has already granted Dietz a temporary injunction against Perez and has ordered the ex-client to change her online reviews.

Perez had written online that the contractor not only performed shoddy workmanship, but some of her jewelry had also disappeared. She further wrote, “Bottom line do not put yourself through this nightmare of a contractor.”

Dietz didn’t take her negative posts lightly, and sued Perez, stating that not only had he completed the job as contracted, but performed more work than was agreed upon and still has not been paid.

Deitz further contends that the negative online reviews have cost him about $350,000.00 in business.

Slander is a legal term for stating a falsehood and presenting it as true which could harm the reputation of a person or business. In the case of Perez, if contractor Dietz did not steal any jewelry (and apparently there is no police report stating that he did) then Perez could be found libel for defamation of character and Dietz would be able to collect damages.

Some might argue that the lawsuit seeks to squash Perez’s right to free speech, but freedom of speech does not protect you from the consequences of free speech.

Perez can offer an opinion like, “I was not happy with the quality of work.” But she cannot say things like “He is a ripoff artist who steals from his clients.” One statement is an opinion based on feelings the other is a statement that she’d have to provide proof that he is a “ripoff artist who has been convicted of stealing from clients.” Technically, you can’t bear false witness, so when leaving an online review, the review must stick to the facts, like “I had to wait two hours for my appointment,” or “My steak was medium when I asked for rare,” or “The toy broke the minute my son picked it up,” and so forth.

It’s been difficult for dentists, as well as business owners to get used to the idea that a dental patient or a patron can complain about their business in such a permanent, public way and the courts are scrambling to legally catch up to this new technology.

And lawsuits themselves can bring more unwanted negative publicity.

Deciding to sue can paint a dentist into a more negative light with the general public than the damage done by the negative review, but what does a dentist do if the online review is truly defamatory?

Hiring an attorney to manage the process of suing the reviewer in court can be extremely costly, so a dentist would need to weigh the costs against any revenue loss directly attributed to the negative review.

The Wealthy Dentist has advised dentists to instead use the money to initiate an aggressive Internet dental marketing campaign to counter the review. Immediately addressing the review in a calm manner can also help quickly counter what the reviewer has said.

Typically the general public does not search past page two of online search results and this is where a dental practice’s online engagement can help bury a negative review. Facebook Pages, Twitter pages, YouTube videos, and Pinterest pages all show up high in search.

If a dental practice has taken the time to develop an internet dental marketing plan for their online presence (using the dentist’s name and the dental practice name) they can fill the first page of Google with their own social media presence.

Regularly updating a blog and writing press releases can also help control what dental patients find when they search for a dental practice online.

If need be, dentists can use the money they would spend on an attorney to buy Google ad space for their dental practice covering the dental practice name, the dentist’s name and a geo-targeted search term like “North Beach dentist.” This will place the dental practice at the very top of search for a period of time. If a dental practice can push the negative review site from the first page of search with content and social media they’ve created specifically for dental patients, they can begin to counter the damage caused by a negative online review.

Recent publicity surrounding negative online review sites and their vulnerability to false negative reviews by competition, or personal vendettas have caused people to question the validity and trustworthiness of consumer review sites. Parodies like Joe Plummer’s “Real Actors Read Yelp Reviews” have further shown just how ridiculous online reviews can be and the lack of oversight by the review sites themselves.

Bodyform even got into the act by responding to a Facebook rant with a video parody making fun of the cliches surrounding women’s use of their feminine products while directly answering the review. Their humorous video response quickly went viral.

Keep in mind that a negative online review can add validity to the positive online reviews. It can make a dental practice appear more balanced and one negative online review in the mix will make most people think it was a difficult dental patient instead of a bad dental practice.

But no business should have to deal with slanderous, vindictive reviews and eventually online review sites are going to have to figure out a way to deal with the libelous reviews, regardless of anti-SLAPP. Eventually a business owner will win big over a slanderous review and online review sites will be forced to set stricter review guidelines.

Would you have sued if a dental patient made the same type of claims against your dental practice that Perez made about Deitz?

To read more about contractor Deitz’s lawsuit see: Virginia Contractor Sues Woman for $750,000 for Bad Yelp Review.

Dental Marketing Tops Dentists’ List of New Year’s Resolutions

Three out of Four Dentists Resolving to Attract More New PatientsNew Years Resolutions for Dentists and Dental Practices

The Wealthy Dentist asked dentists about their resolutions for the New Year. Three out of four dentists said their goal was to attract more new patients. Dentists also cited marketing efforts, knowing that a profitable dental practice needs to market itself to stay competitive. Other goals include retirement, working less, and acquiring new equipment or team members. On a personal level, the number one goal of dentists is to maintain or improve their personal health.

In addition to new patient marketing, dentists had a number of other goals for their dental practices. Here are dentists’ top New Year’s resolutions for their dental practices.

  1. Attract more new patients
  2. Cut costs
  3. Purchase new equipment
  4. Increase Internet dental marketing efforts
  5. Prepare for retirement
  6. Expand treatment options

When asked about their resolutions on a personal level, two out of three dentists cited maintaining or improving their personal health, a befitting goal for health care professionals. Here are their top resolutions for their personal lives.

  1. Maintain or improve personal health
  2. Travel
  3. Lose weight
  4. Spend more time with family
  5. Work less
  6. Learn a new skill

Read the complete New Year’s resolutions dental survey results

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