Dentist Referrals: Dental Implants, Cosmetic Dentistry & Braces

Dentist Referrals: Dental Implants, Cosmetic Dentistry & BracesDentists tend to restore dental implants but refer out dental implant surgery, this survey found.

The average dentist often refers out braces, sedation dentistry, and root canals, while keeping cosmetic dentistry, and denture patients.

Related Story: Dentists: What procedures do you refer out?

When it comes to pediatric dentistry and gum disease, dentists refer some patients out and treat others in house.

Related Story: How Dentists Refer Wisdom Teeth Cases to Oral Surgeons

Overall, the average dentist refers out less than 20% of patients.

Related Story: Root Canal Referrals: Dentists vs. Endodontists

Here are some dentist comments on referring patients:

Read more:

Dental Implants: Regular vs. The Mini Implant

When we asked dentists about dental implants, two out of three dentists reported that they are qualified to offer dental implant therapy. The remaining one out of three dentists do not place implants themselves.

While most love standard implants, opinions about mini dental implants are highly varied. Doctors are split over how often to recommend them.

“Mini implants have worked very well for my patients,” said one dentist, while another opined, “Mini implants are worthless.”

We also asked dentists to select which statement best describes how they feel about the mini dental implant:

  • Good for a variety of implantology patients: 32%
  • Suitable as denture implants for denture patients: 19%
  • Only in a few certain cases: 30%
  • Regular implants are always better: 19%

Here’s a sampling of what dentists had to say:

  • “Compared to cars, regular implants are the Mercedes Benz. Mini implants are the little Toyota Echo.” (Oral surgeon)
  • “Mini implants are good for patients who don’t want or can tolerate regular implants, but failure rates are higher with these minis.” (Arizona dentist)
  • “Mini implants are good for dentures and specific sites, usually as a transitional situation.” (Florida dentist)
  • “Regular implants are better. But for many, minis are the best choice.” (Georgia dentist)
  • “Substandard treatment in most cases.” (California periodontist)
  • “In the correct situation and understanding how to use them, they are a wonderful long-term solution.” (Connecticut dentist)
  • “I did a case with a local specialist, and within 4 months the implants all came out. I looked bad, and the patient left the office. I am not a huge fan of the mini implant.” (Connecticut dentist)
  • “There is seldom an occasion anymore when I can’t replace traditional implants therapy with minis. I’m so thankful I can now offer a less expensive alternative.” (Arkansas dentist)

Read more: Some Dentists Dislike Denture Implants

Introducing The Latest In Dental Controversy: Mini Dental Implants (video)

mini dental implantsMini dental implants newer than traditional implants and they’re more controversial too, with 24% of dentists reporting that they never recommend mini dental implants for their dental patients.

Some doctors love mini implants, while others think they are an inherently inferior product.

Watch this dental survey video below for more on mini dental implants and how doctors feel about them –

Survey: What Questions Do Patients Ask About Dental Implants?

top 5 questions patients ask about implantsWe conducted a survey that asked dentists what questions dental patients ask when considering getting implants. It turns out that there’s a real difference between the questions dental implant patients do ask — and which questions they should be asking.

Dentists responded with the following . . .

The top 5 questions dental patients ask –

  1. How much do dental implants cost?
  2. How long do dental implants last?
  3. Are implants painful?
  4. How long will it take to get my new teeth?
  5. Does dental insurance cover implant surgery?

Versus . . .

The top 5 questions dentists want patients to ask –

  1. Am I a good candidate for implants?
  2. What are the potential complications of dental implant therapy?
  3. How much implant experience does the doctor have?
  4. What is the healing time for my implants?
  5. Can implants improve my appearance?

Many dental implant patients seem to have the same questions about dental implant therapy. Unfortunately, these questions aren’t necessarily the ones dentists think they should be asking.

The 2 main questions patients ask are –

  1. How much do dental implants cost?
  2. Will dental implant surgery be painful?

When dentists feel their very first question should be –

  1. Am I a good candidate for dental implants?

There is really a disconnect between the doctor and patient. This is no surprise, since patients are thinking about how they are going to pay for the implants, and whether the procedure will be painful.

But doctors can’t afford not to address the primary concerns of the patient first: cost and pain.

One dentist wrote, “Long term, when the conditions are favorable, proper bone density, height and width, proper biomechanical considerations, proper occlusal load. A dental implant is more cost effective over a 3 unit bridge. However, when the above conditions are not meet — the 3 unit bridge (with sufficient ferule, impressions taken with custom made tray and properly impressioned, properly articulated, preprosthetic endodontic treatment performed by an endodontist, core-restoration — not in composite) will be more cost effective (for the patient).”

Read more: Dental Implant Questions for the Dentist

Dental Survey: Fees for Dental Implant and Crown

Fees for dental implant and crown

This dental survey from The Wealthy Dentist is short and simple. We asked doctors about their fees for dental implants — specifically what they typically charge for an implant and crown.

What is your typical fee for one dental implant and associated crown?

Fees for a single tooth implant ranged from a low of $1430 without an abutment, to $2765 including an abutment.

Fees for a single dental crown ranged from a low of $1000 to $2620.

As one respondent pointed out, dental implant costs comprise many more components than just an implant and crown.

In reality, there is no “typical” dental implant case, so the actual costs to patients depend on individual case requirements.

Fees vary based on which tooth is being replaced, and can include bone grafts, CT scans and other services.

What are the fees for dental implants in your practice?

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