Cosmetic Dentistry Still Tops the List of Services Dentists Offer

Cosmetic Dentistry Still Tops the List of Services Dentists OfferWhen asked what services their dental practice offers, the dentists who responded with cosmetic dentistry were the clear majority in this survey.

More aging baby boomers are turning to cosmetic dentistry to improve the appearance of their teeth, which may explain the increase in demand for cosmetic dentistry services.

Dental implants are the most popular dental treatment among this demographic for the replacement of damaged or missing teeth.

A California dentist shared, “More than half of our practice is dental implants now!”

Here at The Wealthy Dentist, we were curious what services dentists are currently offering. The top services offered by dentists who responded to this survey are cosmetic, tooth whitening, dental implants, dentures, and children’s dentistry.

Here’s a breakdown of the services dentists are offering —

List of Services Dentists Offer

Dentists were disappointed that other services were not included in this survey, like Botox, oral cancer screenings, or offering custom mouthguards for patient athletes.

One prosthodontist noted, “Oral cancer screening and testing was not on the survey list. Also, it would be interesting to know how many offices provide Botox.”

A general dentist responded that he now offers same day service for CEREC restorations as part of his dental practice services.

Another dentist answered tongue-in-cheek, “I don’t offer gum disease, I treat it.”

What dental services does your dental practice offer? Has the demand for cosmetic dentistry increased?

Where is your dental marketing focused?

Dental Implants Belong to the General Dentist

Dental implants as a dentist specialtyShould dental implants should be a formal dental specialty? Three of four dentists (77%) say no.

“I don’t think it is necessary to make this a specialty since oral surgeons, periodontists, prosthodontists and general dentists like me all place dental implants, and many restore,” offered one doctor. “I do think fellowship training is good, and credentialing is valuable.”

Though 85% of general dentists oppose having implant dentistry as an official specialty, only 67% of specialists feel the same. While some feel that dental implant surgery should only be done by a specialist, most agree that general dentists are fully capable of restoring implants.

Here are some further comments from dentists on dental implantology:

  • “The oral surgeons or periodontists should be placing the implants in the bone – a good restorative dentist can place the dental implant crowns or over- dentures.” (Florida dentist)
  • “I do not believe dentists should be placing tooth implants unless they are certified specialists in implantology.” (Alabama dentist)
  • “It IS a specialty when done at the highest levels.” (Dental implantologist)
  • “Implant dentistry should become a subspecialty recognizing those doctors (specialists and non specialists alike) that have received additional training to perform tooth implant dentistry proficiently.” (Periodontist)
  • “Implants are a part of my General Practice, and have been since 1986. I would hate to see certain fractions in dentistry fight over this….i.e., Oral Surgeons, Periodontist, dentists, etc. It WILL be ugly.” (Massachusetts dentist)
  • “Implants should be dental school course just as endodontics, periodontics, etc.” (General dentist)
  • “The last thing dentistry needs.” (New Jersey dentist)
  • “There are enough turf wars about dental implants as it is. No need to have a separate specialty.” (General dentist)
  • “The politics of delineating who the ‘specialists’ are is an impossible task.” (New York prosthodontist)
  • “Things are good as they are. We should not elevate individuals to royalty status.” (Texas dentist)

Read more: Dental Implants Should Not Be a Specialty, Say Dentists

53% of Dentists Placing Dental Implants (video)

53% of Dentists Placing Dental Implants (video)Dental implants are quickly becoming the dental treatment of choice for dental patients with missing teeth, according to dentists who place dental implants.

Prosthodontists, periodontists and oral surgeons do all the dental implants, but so do general dentists.

Specialists claim that they are more qualified to place implants, but a lot of general dentists also place implants.

Due to the exponential growth in the placement of dental implants in recent years, The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey asking dentists if they place their own dental implants.

Responded one dentist, “I place implants myself, but only in ideal situations.”

Another general dentist said, “After referring my dental patients to specialists and getting back poor work I thought: How much worse can I do? Now I offer implants.”

To hear more of what dentists had to say about dentists placing dental implants, Click on Play to watch the following video:

What are your thoughts on dentists placing dental implants?

Are you placing implants at your dental practice?

Dental Implants May Soon Include Stem Cells

Stem cell dental implantsDental implants are already cutting-edge dental technology… but the next generation of replacement teeth may allow doctors to use your stem cells to grow your own replacement tooth.

There’s no titanium tooth implant. With stem cells and growth enhancers, a scaffold can become a tooth in as little as nine weeks.

Most dentists find dental implants rewarding. This new dental implant technology is still is research, and the cost of dental implants won’t be dropping anytime soon. But stem cells just may be the new titanium.

The study, led by Dr. Jeremy Mao of Columbia University Medical Center, was published in the Journal of Dental Research.

Read more at Popular Science: Stem-Cell Dental Implants Grow New Teeth Right In Your Mouth

The Truth About Dental Tourism

The Truth About Dental TourismDental tourism has become a common practice among many Americans as a way to save money on dental treatments.

Statistics on this trend are hard to come by, but it is estimated that each year over one million people from around the world travel outside their country for some form of dental treatment, with summer being the busiest season for dental tourism.

The highest number of dental tourists is believed to come from the U.S., while Europeans are the second largest group to travel abroad for cheap dental treatments.

There are around 600 – 800 private clinics for surgical medical tourism, of which 80% offer dentistry services.

In recent years, medical travel companies all over the U.S. have sprung up to guide Americans through the dental insurance and logistical hurdles of treatments at medical facilities abroad in places like Mexico. One popular destination for Americans to receive dental treatment is in the Mexicali area, where the dental hub of Los Algodones is located.

Mexicali’s city tourism director, Omar Dipp even meets traveling medical tourists in the lobbies of their hotels.

Dipp recently told the online publication Fontieras that Mexicali received $16 million from medical tourism in 2010. His office is trying to boost that number by 50%.

The top 4 dental treatments patients travel for are –

1. Dental implants.
2. Crowns and bridges.
3. Root canal procedures.
4. Smile makeovers.

Some experts feel the rise in this trend is due to lack of dental insurance among patients, while others feel it is due to the rising costs of what patients have to pay over what dental insurance is willing to pay.

The American Dental Association has acknowledged that dental tourism is an increasing phenomenon that confronts dentists in the United States.

The ADA recommends the following to dentists:

1. A patient’s freedom of choice is an overriding consideration in any situation and is one in which dentists must recognize (ADA Code, Section 1, Patient Autonomy).

2. The ethical dentist will treat the patient who has received dental treatment outside the United States in the same manner as he/she would treat a patient who has transferred their care from any other practice, irrespective of the fact that the treatment performed outside of the United States might or might not be substandard and, in some instances, a possible detriment to the patient’s health.

3. A dentist should consult applicable state law to determine the definition of “patient of record.” Failure to treat such a patient may raise ethical concerns under ADA Code Section 2.F, Patient Abandonment.

4. A dentist should clearly describe to the patient his/her oral health status (ADA Code, Section 4.C, Justifiable Criticism) and maintain carefully documented records of treatment provided. Records should detail the patient’s baseline condition so secondary dental care can be clearly differentiated from treatment performed by another dentist whether in or outside the United States.

5. Where there is an emergency situation that develops as a result of dental tourism and the patient is not—or is no longer—one of record, dentists are obliged, at the least, to make reasonable arrangements for emergency care (ADA Code Section 4.B Emergency Service).

6. Dentists, especially those practicing in border states where dental tourism occurs more frequently, should begin to educate their patients about optimal oral health and costs versus the perceived value of dental tourism and advise them of the potential difficulty in seeking redress if problems are encountered with dental treatment performed in a foreign country.

Dentists, have you dealt with patients receiving dental treatments outside of the U.S.?

Have you lost dental patients due to dental tourism?

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