Dentist Boasts Patients Travel 4 Hours for His Dental Treatments (video)

dental patient travel distanceAn implantologist boasts that many of his dental patients travel up to four hours by car for their dental treatments at his practice. However, as surprising as it might seem, it is not unusual for dental patients to travel hundreds of miles to see their favorite dentist.

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey that asked dentists how far some of their dental patients travel for an appointment at their practice.

Dentists responded that many of their patients travel five to ten miles, but others continue to see them after moving hundreds, or even thousands of miles away.

Click on Play to hear what dentists had to say about patients who travel for their dental appointments –

Not surprisingly, rural patients travel farther to see a dentist than do urban residents.

“Some patients will travel 30+ miles,” wrote a rural dentist, “and then there is the fellow who comes twice a year from the Netherlands…”

Acidic Foods Are a Major Cause of Tooth Decay

 

AGD Focuses on Tooth Erosion from Acidic Foods

At the Academy of General Dentistry’s upcoming annual meeting, speaker Dr. David Bartlett will discuss how to minimize tooth erosion caused by acid. He suggests patients consume acidic food and drink (soda, juice, fruit, yogurt, etc.) quickly and during mealtimes.

The focus is not on the patient’s diet, but simply on exposure to acid. Dr. Bartlett also suggests patients wait at least 20 minutes to brush teeth after eating acidic foods.

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Orthodontist Sued for Missing a Cancerous Lesion

Should Orthodontists Be Held Liable for Missing a Cancerous Lesion?

Lawsuits can strike fear in the hearts of dentists – not only for the costs involved, but for the damage they inflict on a dentist’s reputation that has taken a lifetime to build.

Where does liability end and common sense begin?

Recently the NY state court found that orthodontist Dr. Michael Donato was not negligent in the death of former patient Stephanie Hare. Ms. Hare’s family held Dr. Donato responsible for Stephanie’s death due to failing to detect a cancerous lesion during a December 2003 visit.

In April 2004, a lump was detected on her tongue by Dr. Donato, who ultimately referred her to an oral surgeon. But by then, the cancer was in its advanced stages. She died seven months later.

The family was seeking a $2.3 million award from Dr. Donato for pain and suffering.

The case pivoted around whether jurors would believe the cancerous lesion was present on Dec. 19, 2003 when Ms. Hare’s family said she complained of soreness to Dr. Donato; whether Dr. Donato should have found the lesion during a routine orthodontist examination; and whether he followed standard dental care during the exam.

“Stephanie’s death was not anybody’s fault,” Dr. Donato’s lawyer, Douglas Fitzmorris, told jurors in his summation. “Stephanie died of cancer. Dr. Donato is not to blame. The whole specter of this lesion being missed by Dr. Donato is not what happened. There was no deviation from accepted practice.”

And the jury agreed with Fitzmorris’ assessment of the case.

Should an orthodontist be held liable if he misses a cancerous legion? What if the patient’s complaints sound like issues stemming from braces and not cancer?

For more on this story, see Staten Island Advance.

General Dentists Offer a Variety of Orthodontic Options to Patients

orthodonic options Recently the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) reported that over one million adults are wearing braces. New technologies have widened the options for braces and made them attractive to dental patients of all ages.

No longer do patients fear having a “mouth full of metal.”

We conducted a survey that asked dentists what type of orthodontic options they now offer at their practice.

This was their response –

  • Conventional braces — 22%
  • Ceramic braces — 19%
  • Lingual braces — 6%
  • Invisalign® — 22%
  • Inspice ICE® — 4%
  • ClearCorrect® — 10%
  • Simpli 5® — 6%
  • Smart Moves® — 4%
  • RW II® — 3%
  • Red White & Blue® — 4%

“I have done orthodontics as a GP for 24 years.” (General dentist)

“Patients value the option of avoiding bands and brackets.” (Urban dentist)

“I prefer fixed orthodontia, as it is easier to keep the patient compliant.” (North Carolina dentist)

“Pre-treating arch discrepancies including posterior cross bites with removable orthopedic appliances allow you to finalize many cases with Invisalign®.” (California dentist)

Your Tongue Piercing Could Kill You, Cautions IDA

Tongue and Lip Jewelry Provides Avenue for Potentially Deadly Infections

The Irish Dental Association (IDA) warns that lip and tongue piercings can lead to serious health problems, potentially even death. With no regulations governing body piercings, young people getting pierced run the risk of contracting hepatitis or other blood-borne diseases from Lip Piercing unhygienic piercing needles. The risk is especially high for people with heart murmurs, as the piercing provides an avenue for bacteria to enter the bloodstream , which could possibly lead to infective endocarditis, a potentially fatal heart condition.

Additionally, oral piercings can lead to dental problems. Though a pierced tongue or a lip piercing may appeal to a young person, they should realize the risks: infections can occur, gums can recede, and the metal jewelry can abrade the tooth enamel, even chipping or cracking the tooth. “If you get an oral piercing, you must accept that you will damage your oral health, and, in many cases, what damage you do will be irreversible,” cautions Dr. Kevin O’Boyle of the IDA. (That’s the Irish Dental Association, not the dental marketing company Internet Dental Alliance.)

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