Sedation Dentists: What is the Cost of Sedation Dentistry? (video)

cost of sedation dentistryThe Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey that asked dentists about the cost of sedation dentistry.

The cost of sedation dentistry varies widely among dentists. Of course, if you are a dental patient spending thousands for cosmetic dentistry, then sedation fees are just a drop in the bucket.

The average fee for oral conscious sedation is about $300. Some dentists don’t charge, whereas others ask as much as $650.

A third offer IV sedation, charging about $500. But intravenous sedation fees ranged from $250-$800. Only 6% have general anesthesia capabilities. Ranging from $320 to $1200, anesthesia costs around $700.

“My IV sedation fee is based on the amount of time needed to complete dental procedures,” said a Florida pediatric dentist.

“Most of the time I don’t charge for the sedation as these are usually very large (20K plus) cases,” reported a Texas dentist.

To hear more of what dentists had to say about sedation dentistry, please click play and watch the following survey video –

Conscious sedation dentistry helps lower patients’ anxiety and marketing sedation dentistry to the anxious dental patient is a smart way to bring in new dental patients.

What do you charge for oral conscious sedation at your dental practice?

For more on this survey see: Sedation Dentistry: Cost of Peace of Mind

Dentists Report the Value of Sedation Dental Patients

Dentists Report the Value of Sedation Dental PatientsSedation dental patients can constitute a substantial amount of income for a dental practice over time, especially if the sedation patient remains loyal to a dental practice for several years.

In the most recent The Wealthy Dentist survey, dentists were asked what the average gross production of a new sedation patient was for the first 9 months of treatment in 2012.

Dentists responded that the average value of a sedation patient in 2012 was 10,000. Dentists noted that sedation dental patients are some of the most satisfied patients, who refer more new patients to the dental practice.

Oral sedation patients tend to be the most profitable for dentists, with both oral and IV sedation offering the highest collection rate. However, IV sedation carries the most expensive overhead for a dental practice.

Sedation is a valuable tool in dentistry, especially for anxious patients, children, or those with special needs.

“I love it and think it is very safe,” raved a Michigan dentist. “I think oral conscious sedation is a fantastic way to provide fearful patients a comfortable, safe way of getting their dental work done,” said a California dentist. “When you weigh the negative aspects of dental pathology, conscious sedation provides an avenue of treatment for these otherwise untreatable patients.”

Dentists can easily launch online marketing campaigns to find more new sedation dentistry patients with the New Patient Marketing Machine™ from Internet Dental Alliance, Inc. (IDA). It features turnkey dental marketing website packages that are automatically search engine optimized to attract the specific kinds of high-value patients dentists want.

Visit the Internet Dental Alliance website by clicking here to see how a sedation website can assist a dental practice in attracting dental sedation patients.

What do you think is the value of a sedation patient at your dental practice?

Sedation Dentistry Grows in Popularity Among Dentists

Sedation Dentistry Grows in Popularity Among DentistsPediatric sedation continues to grow in popularity as the number of children with serious dental conditions continues to grow.

The percentage of dentists who reported that sedation dentistry is a great treatment modality increased from 52% in 2010 to 68% in 2012, according to a recent The Wealthy Dentist survey.

The pediatric sedation survey found that suburban dentists are most in favor of sedation dentistry as a treatment option, followed by urban dentists.

Suburban dentists had the most comments on the subject, stressing that conscious sedation requires extensive training because of the risks involved.

One periodontist wrote, “I have been doing all forms of sedation for over 30 years. Young children are very brittle and administration requires advanced training for the safest outcomes.”

According to this survey, rural dentists are less likely to use sedation dentistry than any of the other dentists surveyed.

Here’s how the dentists answered when asked what best described their attitude towards pediatric sedation dentistry —

  • 68% – It’s a great treatment modality that requires proper training.
  • 05% – I still am not certain of its safety.
  • 27% – General dentists should not be performing pediatric sedation.

Sedation dentistry continues to become more common in pediatric dental care as the number of young children with serious dental issues is on the increase.

Here are some of the dentist’s comments —

“At our office an MD anesthesiologist provides sedation while I perform the dentistry. Clearly this is reserved primarily for the larger cases.” (Missouri dentist)

“Proper training is the key to the use of sedation.” (California dentist)

“It definitely requires proper training and absolute attention to detail otherwise it can without doubt, be deadly.” (Louisiana dentist)

“General dentists should not be performing pediatric sedation.” (Virginia dentist)

“I frankly am not in favor of sedation. It is overdone. Discussing their fears, proceeding slowly at first, and securing the patients confidence without drugging them is better in the long run.” (Michigan dentist)

“It’s the only way to treat some kids. I sure am thankful that I can refer to someone who does it as I would not want the liability and stress myself.” (Georgia dentist)

“It requires extensive training and case selection is very important.” (Pediatric dentist)

Dentists, what are your thoughts about sedation dentistry?

Dentist Feels Sedation Dentistry Helps Many Patients

Dentist Feels Sedation Dentistry Helps Many PatientsThree out of four dentists surveyed offer sedation dentistry.

“Sedation dentistry helps so many people. Most stop using it after three visits or so due to a significant lessening of their anxiety,” responded one prosthodontist to the latest The Wealthy Dentist survey that asked dentists if they offer dental sedation.

“Sedation is not the be-all, end-all,” advised one dentist.

The respondents to this survey reflected the following charges for sedation services —

The lowest cost of conscious sedation dentistry was $70, and the highest charge was $680. The cost of IV sedation ranged from $225 up to $1,200.

Percent of dentists who perform sedation dentistry

Here are some comments from dentists who responded to this survey —

“It is great combination with CEREC users. One appointment dentistry while sedated.” (General dentist)

“There is a strong pain-in-the-butt factor associated with this service. Don’t get sucked into it.” (Massachusetts dentist)

“I’ve been sedating for 30 years.” (California dentist)

“I am a dentist anesthesiologist. I charge an hourly fee. I am perfectly fine with my client doctors doing oral sedation with proper training. I think it is important that they have someone like me to check with if they have a question or concern.” (Washington dentist anesthesiologist)

“Having well-trained providers of dental sedation is a key to our success as a profession. As long as there are dentists who believe in papoosing, there will be those who have fears. Funny, an ENT would never papoose a child for ear tubes. Why do we think it’s acceptable for dental treatment?” (Pediatric dentist)

If you are a doctor who offers sedation dentistry to your patients, it’s important to market this fact to potential patients. It can help bring new patients into your dental practice.

Sedation Dentistry Gone Wild: Dentist Pulls All Ex’s Teeth

Sedation Dentistry Gone Wild: Dentist Pulls All Ex's TeethBreaking up is hard to do, especially when you’re a dentist from Poland.

A freshly dumped dentist is facing jail time after surgically removing all of her ex-boyfriend’s teeth.

Apparently, dental patient Marek Olszewski stopped by ex-girlfriend Anna Machowiak’s dental practice with a bad toothache just days after breaking up with her for another woman.

Dentist Machowiak agreed to treat Olszewski and that’s when things went haywire for the former couple.

Once the ex was sedated, the dentist suddenly had second thoughts. “I tried to be professional and detach myself from my emotions,” Anna Machowiak told the U.K.’s Daily Mail. “But when I saw him lying there, I just thought, ‘What a b——d.’”

That’s when she decided to pull out all of his teeth.

Talk about sedation dentistry gone wild!

When Marek Olszewski awoke from his sleep dentistry, dentist Machowiak informed him that there was “complications” and that his face was wrapped to prevent him from opening his mouth.

According to the Daily Mail, Machowiak told her ex-boyfriend that his mouth was numbed and that he wouldn’t be able to feel anything for a while and that the bandage was there to protect the gums, but that he would need to see a specialist.

Once he arrived home and went to examine what was done, he found that all of his teeth had been pulled.

Dentist Mackowiak is under investigation for medical malpractice and abusing the trust of a dental patient. She could face up to three years in prison. I’m sure they could use an experience sedation dentist in prison.

And what is it they say about karma?

Olszewski’s new girlfriend dumped him because he no longer has any teeth.

Under the UK’s dental health plan the poor guy could be looking at years of waiting for dental implants . . . but I’m sure he could start with a nice set of dentures.

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