Dentist Burnout Archives - The Wealthy Dentist

Dentist Continuing Education May Cure Dental Burnout Symptoms (video)

Dentist Continuing Education May Cure Dental Burnout SymptomsEveryone feels burnout now and then, but dentists are especially at risk for professional burnout.

Said one dentist, “Burnout to me is manly the result of the negative light in which most dental patients view the dental office experience.”

Another dentist advised, “Taking continuing education to learn and improve techniques rejuvenates my practice. It keeps me fresh!”

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey asking dentists if they have ever suffered from professional burnout in their dental careers.

Click on Play to watch the video to hear more of  what dentists have to say about burnout

What do you do to avoid professional burnout?

How Dentists Deal With Dental Practice Burnout (video)

How Dentists Deal With Dental Burnout (video)It has been argued that dentistry can be a stressful occupation.

Possible root causes are demanding patient interactions, negative perceptions about dentistry, financial pressures from running a dental practice, challenging workloads, ever-changing new dental technologies, and lack of resources needed to create change.

The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey to ask dentists if they have ever suffered from professional burnout.

A Massachusetts dentist responded, “Burnout to me is mainly the result of negative light in which most people view the dental office experience.”

4 out of 5 dentists in this survey answered that they have experienced professional burnout in their dental careers.

One dentist offered his solution to avoiding burnout, “Taking continuing education courses to learn and improve technologies rejuvenates my dental practice. It keeps me fresh.”

To hear more of what dentists had to say about professional burnout, Click Play to watch the following video:

Have you experienced burnout with your dental career?

For more information about burnout see: Dental Practice Burnout: 5 Symptoms and 5 Remedies

Burnout In Dentistry: Hear What Dentists Think (video)

Burnout in Dentistry: Hear What Dentists ThinkThe Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey to ask dentists if they have ever suffered from professional burnout.

4 out of 5 dentists respondents said that they have experienced professional burnout in their dental careers.

Possible root causes are demanding patient interactions, negative perceptions about dentistry, financial pressures from dental practice management, challenging workloads, ever-changing new dental technologies, and lack of resources needed to create change.

Burnout in dentistry is considered either emotional or physical exhaustion, usually caused by stress at work. It was initially described in the 1950s by Hans Selye as ‘the nonspecific response of the body to any demand made upon it and discouragement in the work setting.’

According to the U.C. Irvine report, burnout is viewed also as a complex of psychological responses (strain) to the particular stress of constant interaction with people who are in need. Differing from other interactional symptoms related to job stress is the effect on others seen as a depersonalization of clients.

One dentist responded,“If dentists dropped managed care and got better fees for their hard work, it would reduce burnout significantly.”

Click on Play to see this short video and hear more of what other dentists had to say about dentist burnout when responding to this survey —

Have you ever experienced work burnout? How did you handle it?

Dental Practice Burnout: 5 Symptoms and 5 Remedies

Dental Practice Burnout: 5 Symptoms and 5 RemediesAccording to the University of California, Irvine Department of Medicine, the health professionals most at risk for burnout are physicians, nurses, social workers, dentists, care providers in oncology and AIDS-patient care personnel, among others.

In many of The Wealthy Dentist surveys dentists have complained of career burnout.

Burnout is considered either emotional or physical exhaustion, usually caused by stress at work. It was initially described in the 1950s by Hans Selye as ‘the nonspecific response of the body to any demand made upon it and discouragement in the work setting’.

According to the U.C. Irvine report, burnout is viewed also as a complex of psychological responses (strain) to the particular stress of constant interaction with people who are in need. Differing from other interactional symptoms related to job stress is the effect on others seen as a depersonalization of clients.

Symptoms of Burnout –

1. Negative Feelings.
Feelings of disillusionment and being ‘stretched too thin’. Feeling that you aren’t making a ‘difference’ in your approach to lifelong goals. Other feelings of burnout are the feeling of being ‘run down’, easily frustrated and feeling that you are unable to concentrate.

2. Interpersonal Problems.
Your tolerance level drops as the burnout grows and you find yourself increasingly unable to handle social interactions. You begin to dehumanize your relationships by thinking of your dental patients not as people but as objects.

3. Physical Manifestations.
Burnout shows up physically as exhaustion, muscle pain, headaches, insomnia, respiratory illnesses, gastrointestinal disorders, depression, and hypertension.

4. Substance Abuse.
Often people suffering from burn-out will self-medicate their anxiety, depression and insomnia with drugs or alcohol.

5. Inefficiency at Work.
Burnout causes productivity to wane as you become less effective overall, either by hiding in your office or staying away from work more often.

Remedies for Burnout –

1. Take a Two Week Vacation.
Quite often by distancing yourself from your work you will be able to make some decisions on things you can do differently to alleviate stress when you return to your dental practice.

2. Cut Back Your Work Hours.
Sometimes burnout appears from an unwillingness to delegate job duties. Consider cutting back on your work load by delegating tasks you don’t enjoy and consider cutting back your dental practice hours if you can.

3. Schedule Time For You During the Day.
Make sure you always take a lunch break. Make it at least an hour and a half three days a week and schedule some light exercise for the last half hour like a brisk walk around the block or a yoga class.

4. Put Your Health First.
Go to bed at the same time every night and work on getting enough sleep. Look at your diet and see where you can cut out high sugar foods, and make time to relax with good friends on weekends.

5. Write Your Thoughts Down.
Some people find that keeping a journal at home and expressing your feelings of frustration on paper can go a long ways towards helping you deal with burnout. Commenting anonymously on this blog might even help too.

The most critical thing about burnout is to recognize it’s a shout out from your exhausted self. Try changing things up a bit in your life to break out of your routine. Come into the office thirty minutes later, drive a different route to work, learn a new hobby, or work on something you love. Take a break and list all the reasons you chose dentistry as your profession in the first place.

Have you ever suffered from burnout?  What advice would you give dentists for dealing with burnout?

Four of Five Dentists Suffer from Dental Burnout

Dentistry Demands a Lot from Dental Practitioners

Dental Survey Results When we asked dentists if they’ve ever suffered from professional burnout in their dental careers, a whopping 81% said yes. Only 19% reported that they had never felt burnt out in dentistry.

“If dentists dropped managed care and got better fees for their hard work, it would reduce burnout significantly,” said one dentist wistfully. “Get rid of people in the office who drag you down,” offered another. “Sometimes the very best first step is to sell the practice, take a year off, relax, think, and plan new strategies,” advised an implantologist.

Tips to ease your life

  • “Work 4 days a week. Have a good staff. Take long lunch breaks. Use fewer rooms.” (Vermont dentist)
  • “Deal with dentistry, not finances.” (Illinois dentist)
  • “Take quarterly vacations.” (Illinois dentist)
  • “Taking dental continuing education classes rejuvenates my practice and keeps me fresh.” (Illinois dentist)
  • “Have a life outside of dentistry.” (New York dentist)
  • “Don’t get overwhelmed by a schedule that is not commensurate with your ebbing strength as you hit retirement age.” (California dentist)

What dentists think about burnout

  • “I’m a relatively new dentist, and no one warned me about the dangers of high stress, high debt, low reimbursements and staffing issues.” (Illinois dentist)
  • “If you view each patient as unique, each with their own set of physical and mental aspects to their mouths, how can dentistry get boring?” (Maryland dentist)
  • “The over-40 crowd needs time away to counter burnout.” (Texas pediatric dentist)
  • “Burnout to me is mainly the result of the negative light in which most people view the dental office experience.” (Massachusetts dentist)
  • “It’s having a great, loyal, professional and mature staff along with a great flow of new patients who want what I have to sell and where money is no object. So, how do I find that? LOL.” (Texas dentist)

Read the complete dental burnout survey results or post your own comments

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