Dental Products: Changes Linked to BPA

BPA in dental productsOne dentist in eight has changed dental products or materials because of worries about BPA content, this survey found.

When we previously surveyed dentists on the topic of bisphenol-A, we found about half of dentists were worried about BPA in dental composite and sealants.

“Patients should be told restorative treatment and material options, risks, benefits, average longevity, etc. (of composite, amalgam, castings, etc.). Then, as a well-respected lecturer sarcastically says, they can ‘pick their poison,'” said a Maryland dentist. “I wonder if, a few decades from now, we will still see the short longevity composites to be as safe as amalgam is and was for 160 years.”

Read more: Dentists Change Dental Materials over BPA

Dental Safety: BPA Exposure and Dental Sealants (video)

Dental Safety: BPA Exposure and Dental Sealants (video)This week Campbell’s Soup Company announced that they are phasing out bisphenol A (BPA) in their canned food linings.

BPA is a chemical that can imitate human estrogen and is thought by some health care providers to be harmful to health.  BPA is commonly used additive in food packaging and dental sealants.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also reported that they will make a decision by March 30th on whether to the ban the use of bisphenol A in food and beverage packaging.

Dental composites have revolutionized dentistry, especially cosmetic dentistry. But composite resins and dental sealants also contain BPA.

Warned one dentist, “It’s a dangerous chemical that we are placing in a sensitive area, free to leech out 24 hours a day.”

Another dentist said, “The cumulative release of BPA from composites appears to be minimal from the available research.”

Recently there’s been a lot of negative publicity about bisphenol A being linked to heart disease, obesity and diabetes. In light of these recent reports, The Wealthy Dentist conducted a survey asking dentists if they have dental safety concerns over dental composites.

Click on Play to hear how the dentists responded to the survey —

What are your thoughts on the use of BPA in cosmetic dentistry?

BPA & Dental Composite Safety (Survey Video)

Dental safety and BPAControversies about chemical safety are hardly new to dentistry. So it’s not surprising to find that dentistsare split down the middle in their opinions about the use of dental composite and sealants that contain bisphenol-A, or BPA as it’s commonly known.

In this survey, 46% said they had concerns about safety, while 54% are not particularly worried.

Jim Du Molin and Julie Frey discuss dentists’ thoughts on BPA safety:

“I’ve never had a patient even mention it, unlike the wackos who won’t let fluoride touch their kids’ lips,” offered a Michigan Dentist.

“I have some worries about safety,” said one General Dentist. “To temper this, you’ve got to remember that ANYTHING in the body outside of what is indigenous is considered foreign and has potential to elicit yet another of those unexpected side effects, sort of like most of Congress’ laws. Since I stopped doing sealants years and years ago, I am less concerned about the effect on most adults.”

“Are any of my patients worried about BPA? They should be!” exclaimed an Orthodontist. “My kids will never have sealants. Sealants are BS. Another way the insurance companies dictate how a dentist can make money: by compromising morals, yet again.”

It’s worthwhile to bring up safety concerns about Bisphenol-A in dental sealants and fillings. Unfortunately, the science isn’t particularly clear.

We still don’t have definitive scientific evidence that everyone agrees on when it comes to mercury, or even fluoride. So don’t expect the BPA controversy to be resolved anytime soon.

Read more about the dental survey here.

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Dentists Not Concerned About Chemicals Used in Dentistry

Dentists Not Concerned About Chemicals Used in Dentistry“Not particularly worried” is the most popular response for concerns about the chemicals in dentistry among dentists, according to a new The Wealthy Dentist survey, but the results are pretty evenly split.

The online survey asked dentists from the U.S. and Canada if they are concerned about the safety of dental composite and sealants.

54% were not worried, while 46% had concerns about safety.

Here’s how the dentists responded —

  • 21% – Definitely yes! I am very concerned about this issue.
  • 25% – Somewhat. I have some worries about safety.
  • 38% – Not really. I’m interested, but not particularly worried.
  • 16% – Definitely not! I’m not worried at all.

Chemicals Used in Dentistry Survey Results Graph

“It’s about the same argument as the amalgam and mercury issue. I don’t see that the literature to date points in any direction toward concern about BPA!” a Mississippi dentist said.

BPA in tooth fillings has been in the news recently due to a study linking the chemical to behavioral problems in children.

According to Dr. John Reitz of Reading Eagle Press, “When dental manufacturers became aware of the health risk of BPA they made a conscious effort at eliminating or at least limiting the amount in dental products. According to research by the American Dental Association, BPA is rarely used today as an ingredient in dental products.”

Most of the dentists who responded to this survey agree that there are minimal risks from dental chemicals.

Here’s what many dentists had to say on the subject —

“We need more long-term studies.” (New Jersey dentist)

“To temper this, we have to remember that ANYTHING in the body outside of what is indigenous is considered foreign and has potential to elicit yet another of those unexpected side effects, sort of like most of Congress’ laws. Since I stopped doing sealants years and years ago, I am less concerned about the effect on most adults.” (General dentist)

“Amalgam is on its way out. Let the chemist reformulate BPA-free dental products!” (Alabama dentist)

“I didn’t know that I need to be concerned…” (California dentist)

“No patients have shown any worry. I do feel extensive research should be conducted.” (Mississippi dentist)

“Yes – patients ask about it! But I understand there are different kinds…some more damaging than others.” (Michigan dentist)

“I’ve never had a patient even mention it, unlike the ‘wackos’ who won’t let fluoride touch their kids lips…” (General dentist)

“None of our patients have mentioned it, yet. But, I won’t be surprised if or when they do in the future. I’m personally concerned about BPA in composites. I certainly didn’t want it in the plastic baby bottles my child used, so why would I want it in composite resin dental restorations? Dentistry certainly needs to have BPA free restorative materials.” (Ohio dentist)

“Parents are now asking me about our materials and if they contain BPAs.” (Pediatric dentist)

The ADA Council on Scientific Affairs has not identified evidence to suggest that the use of resin-based dental sealants or composite resin restorative materials is linked to adverse health effects from BPA exposure. (Source: ADA)

Dentists, what are your thoughts on chemicals used in dentistry?

Dentists: BPA is Back Making Front Page Dental News Again

BPA in Children is Making Front Page Dental NewsBisphenol A (also known as BPA), a chemical used in lightweight plastics, dental sealants and dental fillings is back making news headlines once again.

First, the federal government announced this month that baby bottles and sippy cups can no longer contain BPA.

This was followed by reports from a new study stating that children getting dental fillings made with BPA are more likely to have behavior and emotional problems later in life.

The study, as reported in Pediatrics Online, “makes a strong case that in the short-term, use of BPA-containing dental materials should be minimized,” asserts Philip Landrigan, director of the Children’s Environmental Health Center at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City.

The researchers in the study tracked 534 children with cavities from when each child received their first dental fillings. Over the following 5 years, the researchers noted that those children who had cavities filled with a composite material containing traces of BPA consistently scored 2 – 6 points less on 100-point behavior assessments than those who didn’t have fillings.

As reported in Science News, the researchers never administered clinical diagnostic behavioral tests to the children.

Instead, they periodically administered some widely used checklists to the children or their parents, allowing each to self-assess features such as a child’s attitudes toward teachers or others, depression, self-esteem, attention problems, delinquent behaviors, acting-out or problems with attentiveness.

Since the children were 6-12 years old at the time, these type of behaviors are not uncommon for children living with a variety of circumstances like divorce, bullying, and problems at home.

However researchers argue that the behavior problems being reported seemed to happen more with the children who had BPA fillings, causing them to believe that some dental fillings may start to break down over time, thus exposing these children to the chemical.

The U.S. government is currently spending $30 million on its own BPA research to determine the chemical’s health effects on humans.

As a dentist, what are your thoughts on the use of BPA?

For more on this story see: Putting BPA-based Dental Fillings in Perspective 

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